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EDITIONS
Monday, 17 February, 2003, 16:03 GMT
Anti-war protest - Live in London
Protesters against a war with Iraq have been marching in London. With the aid of mobile phone camera, BBC News Online's Megan Lane and Phil Coomes gathered views from along the route.

Name Sarah Johnson & Jason Allcourn
Location American Embassy
Time Posted 1643 GMT

I'm quite a moderate person but I felt it important to be here today just the fact that it's people of all ages not just extremists has made this a really powerful rally. It's nice that I've seen children and old people and wheelchairs - everyone really. (Sarah)

This has turned out to be quite a juggernaut it's the first time I've been on a march this size - I guess the first time any of us have. I wanted to be here because I believe it's a war without just cause. (Jason)

Name Michael Cant
Location Hyde Park
Time Posted 1609 GMT

I came on the march because I felt like doing something positive for the country. I live in London and I feel very much a part of this multicultural city and marching today feels like doing something positive for London too. I don't agree with the policies of Bush and Blair and I don't believe that the preparation for Britain going to war is a democratic process.

Name Sash Naidoo
Location Speaker's Corner, Hyde Park
Time Posted 1533 GMT

I came on this march because I believe violence begets violence - war is a bad idea and spells trouble for Britain. I never been part of anything like this before I walked down here from Tottenham Court Road and it's quite something to be in amongst so many people from different backgrounds.

Name Michelle Haeems, John Brook, Bouncer
Location Hyde Park
Time Posted 1452 GMT

I'd like to hear more people chanting "yes to peace" rather than no war - after all we're trying to fight the concept of war and our message should be solution based. We've been in Hyde Park since the speeches began and it's been really powerful stuff. An Iraqi man stood up and said his people don't want this [war] - he shouldn't still be having to say this after all these years.

Name Jennifer Connell
Location Piccadilly
Time Posted 1417 GMT

This is my first march since the "ban the bomb" rally of the sixties. I've given up politics and taken up spiritualism but for this I've had to come out of retirement. Saddam Hussein has got to be stopped, but if we go to war then we'll really know what terrorism is. I fear Britain will face retaliation, even in the past week I've been very upset and emotional because of the heightened state of alert.

Name Michelle Austin
Location Trafalgar Square
Time Posted 1315 GMT

I think we've been lied to about the motives for this war. First George W Bush made a speech about the axis of evil and this morning Tony Blair has been telling us that it's on humanitarian grounds. I don't care how smart those bombs are innocent people are going to be killed. I think the UN inspectors should be given more time to do their job.

Name Robert Butchat
Location outside the Ministry of Defence
Time Posted 1250 GMT

Tony Blair said today that he had to have the commitment to do the right thing in Iraq, but that's not democratic. He should do what the people want him to do. When you get half a million on the street it has got to send a message that he can't just do what he wants without suffering the consequences. I think he'll face a revolt within his own party or be voted out at the next election.

Name Francesca Morrison
Location Westminster
Time Posted 1230 GMT

I thought I needed to show that we were against the war so the prime minister can't say that he has the backing of his people. We're following the US but I think it's really trigger-happy after 11 September. I don't think Saddam Hussein should be in power but there are other ways to get him out - I think the weapon inspectors should be given more time.

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