BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 29 January, 2003, 10:25 GMT
Worried? Confused? Get answers here
There is no shortage of questions about the crisis with Iraq. But here's your chance to get some answers.

There are thousands of questions to be asked about what might happen in Iraq. What are the risks of action? How will the key players act? What are the implications for the rest of the world?

Here is your chance to get answers to the questions that matter to you. You can put your query to our panel of experts in their field. Some of them are BBC experts, some come from outside. Send your question using the form below, and in the coming days the panel will try to answer them.

The panel

ETHICS OF WAR
Can war be ethical? Does the concept of a "just war" hold much relevance in 2003? Julian Baggini, editor of The Philosophers' Magazine and author of Making Sense: Philosophy Behind the Headlines (OUP), will answer your questions about the ethics of war.


VIEW FROM WASHINGTON
A key factor in this crisis will be the attitude in the White House, not least the balance between hawks and doves. The BBC's Washington correspondent Nick Bryant is on hand to answer questions from the US capital.


COMMUNITY RELATIONS
The impact of any conflict will be felt much further afield than just the Middle East. There could be implications for how multi-cultural societies get on. The BBC's social affairs correspondent Barnie Choudhury will take your questions on what the impact might be.


MIDDLE EAST POLITICS/ ISLAMIC AFFAIRS
While decisions in Washington, New York, and London will be key, the focus of most people's attention is on the Middle East. What are the reactions of Arab countries? What will be the knock-on effect of any action? The BBC's Middle East analyst, Roger Hardy, who is also an expert on Islamic affairs, will take your questions.


DIPLOMACY
The tensions pose enormous challenges for diplomacy. Can talking avert conflict? Bridget Kendall, the BBC's diplomatic correspondent, and formerly our woman in Moscow and Washington, will deal with diplomatic matters.


MILITARY OPERATIONS
Chris Lincoln-Jones led a reconnaissance unit in the Gulf War in 1991 as part of 1st (UK) Armoured Division. He has been an Iraq analyst for the Ministry of Defence, and has also spent time as a UN weapons inspector in Iraq. He is now a freelance defence consultant, and will take your questions on military matters.


VIEW FROM BAGHDAD
While all the talk goes on around the world, and with the prospect of conflict looming ever larger, what is the atmosphere like on the streets of Baghdad? The BBC's Rageh Omaar is there, and is ready for your questions.


MILITARY HISTORY AND PROPAGANDA
But what lessons, if any, can be learnt from history? Are governments or the media falling into old traps? Dr Gary Sheffield is senior lecturer in defence studies at King's College London, based at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, and is an expert on military history and strategy and on media and cultural perceptions of war.


VIEW FROM WESTMINSTER
Tony Blair's role in backing President Bush is seen by some as a high risk strategy. While trying to keep the US acting as part of the UN, and struggling to keep EU partners' support of the process, Mr Blair is also facing opposition from his own party and - polls suggest - the country at large. BBC political correspondent Laura Trevelyan will take questions on the view from Downing Street.


PROTEST
Not long ago, many people bemoaned the lack of widespread interest in politics. But the growth in the anti-war movement, with demonstrations taking place in many major cities, has illustrated that many are engaged with what is going on with Iraq. Professor Peter Waddington, of Reading University, is an expert in the politics of protest and will take your questions.


Send us your questions:
Name:

City/Country:

E-mail address:

Your question:

Disclaimer: The BBC will put use as many of your questions as possible but we cannot guarantee that all e-mails will be used. The BBC reserves the right to edit comments that are used.
Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes