BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: UK  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Sunday, 19 January, 2003, 11:36 GMT
Fiction thwarts ultimate holiday hunt
Hogwarts School
Hogwarts will not be found on a UK road map
As holiday destinations they offer stunning scenery, a step back in time and the chance to experience some literary magic.

But one significant drawback is leaving the growing number of travellers trying to book breaks at them disappointed: they do not exist.

According to a travel website more and more people are trying to track down locations immortalised in blockbuster films such as Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings.

Hogwarts locations
Gloucester Cathedral
Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire
Bodleian Library, Oxford
Christ Church College, Oxford
Alnwick Castle, Northumberland
Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry - the school attended by Harry Potter - is portrayed in the films using a variety of real locations around the UK.

Mordor and Rivendell, known to fans of Lord of the Rings as part of Middle Earth, are other popular holiday search terms on Yahoo Travel.

But then Mordor could possibly be every holidaymaker's nightmare, being the dangerous and evil stronghold of the forces of darkness.

Morgan Williams, travel producer at yahoo.co.uk, said: "It is interesting to see the effect that certain films, such as Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings, can have on people's imagination.

"Personally I'd never want to go to Mordor. The film's real location, New Zealand, on the other hand, is a truly magical place."

According to Yahoo, the latest Lord of the Rings film The Two Towers has sparked much interest in genuine places to visit in New Zealand.

That was the hope of the New Zealand government, who expected the trilogy would give the country an economic boost.

It is estimated the films so far have given the capital city Wellington tourist revenue worth 138m.

The government appointed Pete Hodgson as unofficial minister for Lord of the Rings and spent millions on promoting the country.

See also:

06 Dec 01 | Entertainment
12 Jun 01 | Entertainment
24 Nov 02 | Scotland
11 Nov 02 | England
07 Dec 01 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes