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 Tuesday, 7 January, 2003, 13:07 GMT
Quiz: How widespread is anti-Americanism?
UK Prime Minister Tony Blair is warning of the dangers of anti-Americanism, saying alliances with the US have brought decades of stability, while pressing the US to accept the importance of world issues like the Middle East.

But how widespread do you think anti-Americanism is? Take our quiz.

In 2000, 37% of Russians had favourable views towards the US, a survey found. In 2002 was that figure:
A: Higher
B: Lower
C: The same
The same survey measured views of the US in strategic Muslim nations. From these six nations in the survey, which one had more people in favour of the US than against it?
A: Egypt
B: Jordan
C: Lebanon
D: Pakistan
E: Turkey
F: Uzbekistan
In one of these EU countries, favourable views towards the US increased between 2000 and 2002, the survey found. Which one?
A: Germany
B: UK
C: Italy
D: France
Does the US listen to its allies when it works out its foreign policy? The survey found that people in only one of these countries thought that it did. Which one?
A: Canada
B: UK
C: Germany
D: France
Who said: "Every day I encounter some sort of anti-American feeling... sometimes it's from a newspaper columnist, sometimes it's from 'peace' demonstrators. Now I find that I want to be around Americans."
A: Chelsea Clinton, reporting widespread anti-Americanism while at Oxford University
B: Former ad-woman Charlotte Beers, who was given the job of promoting the US "brand" around the world, while on a fact-finding mission
C: Tony Blair, speaking in Washington about attitudes in the UK
Who worked as a "soda jerk" in South Carolina in 1953 - a job which he says made him a life-long fan of the American way?
A: French President Jacques Chirac
B: Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi
C: Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf
Who said: "I wish I could speak their beautiful language, but I can communicate well with the people."
A: Howard H Leach, US ambassador to Paris
B: US President George W Bush
C: Britney Spears touring Japan
People in most countries in the survey said they rejected the idea of the spread of American ideas and customs. And yet most welcomed US culture, films, television, businesses and technology. Which of these was welcomed the most?
A: Culture
B: Films
C: Television
D: Businesses
E: Technology
After 11 September, which newspaper had the headline: "We are all Americans now"?
A: France's Le Monde
B: Israel's Ha`aretz
C: The Times of India
D: The Sun, UK
Last year author Salman Rushdie wrote that night after night, he listened to Londoners' diatribes against Americans. Four things were, for them, the crucial issues, he wrote; Americans' patriotism, emotionality, and self-centredness were three. What was the fourth?
A: Their obesity
B: Their low-brow culture
C: That they didn't 'get' sarcasm

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07 Jan 03 | Politics
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