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EDITIONS
 Monday, 6 January, 2003, 12:48 GMT
Your top prediction for 2003
Last week we asked you to vote on what was the top prediction from the world of celebrity, technology, politics and fashion.

From a range of predictions made by experts in their field, thousands of you were clear in your voting as to which was the most likely to come true.

FASHION
Laurence Llewelyn Bowen
Changing clothes?
Peter York, cultural commentator and chronicler, said in 2003 people would be dressing like Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen.

Hard economic times spelt an end to cool, muted, millennial colours and sleek minimalism, he said. It may well be true, but you evidently thought things would have to get a lot harder before you started wearing velvet. Just 4.75% thought York would be proved right.

TECHNOLOGY
Trevor Baylis and clockwork radio
Unwind with your laptop
Trevor Baylis, inventor of the wind-up radio, predicted this would be the year for wind-up laptops.

"I think we'll see laptop computers with dynamo power handles sticking out the back," he said. Not many of you agreed, just 13.88%. If you're right, we'll be sticking with plugging-in to charge this time next year.

CELEBRITY
Meg Matthews and Noel Gallagher
The right chemistry?
Sarah Delamere Hurding, a psychic, saw a reunion on the cards between Noel Gallagher and his former wife Meg Matthews. You didn't.

"For the sake of their child I feel that they will realise that life is too short for nonsense and friction," she said. But you proved yourselves sceptics about the psychic. Mind you, she predicted her prediction would not win the vote.

POLITICS
Michael Howard
Help in hour of need?
Tony Howard, veteran political commentator, said Tory leader Iain Duncan-Smith would resign, and Michael Howard would be his successor.

You rated this the second most likely prediction to come true, with nearly 24% of you voting for it.

ROYALTY
Queen and Prince Philip leaving Sandringham
Another annus horribilis?
Harold Brooks-Baker, publisher of Burke's Peerage and royalty expert, predicted the first Parliamentary attempt to strip the Queen of her residual powers, which include things like appointing the prime minister and declaring war.

Nearly 22% of you agreed with him that a bill was on the cards and that it would be a miserable year for Her Majesty.

TRANSPORT
Congestion charging logo
Charge of the right brigade?
Christian Wolmar, an expert on the UK's travel woes, predicted that against people's expectations, London's congestion charging scheme will not be a flop.

And you agreed with him. This prediction was the one you chose as most likely to come true, with nearly 32% of you thinking Wolmar was bang on the money. Perhaps it will bring a smile to Major of London Ken Livingstone's face.

Thanks to everyone who voted. Full results are below. We will keep an eye on the predictions in the coming year, and come Christmas will see how wise everyone has been.

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