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 Thursday, 5 December, 2002, 08:34 GMT
Supermarket bubbly tops taste test
Champagne
Champagnes fared better than sparkling wines
A supermarket's own-label champagne has come top of a blind taste test ahead of famous names, according to a report.

Experts voted Tesco's 12.99 bubbly better tasting than better-known champagnes such as Moet and Chandon and Bollinger.

The supermarket's Premier Cru Champagne Brut NV was not the cheapest of all the bottles tried, but it came out as favourite.

The taste test was carried out for the consumer magazine Which? using seven wine experts, none of whom knew which bottles they were trying.

'Great price'

Moet and Chandon, price 20.47 a bottle, came 13th in the list of 24 champagnes and 11 sparkling wines, while Veuve Clicquot, at 23.99, did slighter better coming in at 11th place.

Bollinger, the most expensive champagne tried at 27.99 a bottle, was in 12th position.

Helen Parker, editor of Which?, said: "The good news is that you don't have to splash out or buy a well-known brand to enjoy delicious champagne.

"Sometimes buying the label is part of the fun, but if you want a great tasting wine at a great price, you couldn't do better than a 12.99 bottle of bubbly from Tesco."

Grapes

The bubbly voted second best was Champagne H Blin Brut 1996, available from off-licence chain Oddbins for 18.99.

In third place was G H Martel and Co Prestige Brut Champagne NV, priced 15.99, sold through Safeway.

Grapes of a different kind were causing a stir for Tesco last week, with news that three different customers each found a black widow spider in their bag of fruit.

The supermarket chain admitted that a drive to use less pesticides in its food could mean more spiders turning up in bags of fruit, but denied that it was using the black widow variety.

See also:

10 Oct 02 | Business
20 Jul 02 | From Our Own Correspondent
17 Feb 02 | Business
30 Jan 02 | Business
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