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EDITIONS
Thursday, 21 November, 2002, 14:22 GMT
Princess Royal court case highlights
Charge sheet
The charge sheet for Anne Elizabeth Alice Lawrence
Princess Anne was fined 500 after pleading guilty to a charge that one of her dogs attacked two children. Here are key excerpts from the case at Slough magistrates court.


"Dotty, like many of that breed, is a good-natured dog.
"All those who know the dog have found her exceptionally good and wholly lacking in malice.
"She is described by one person who knows her well as a 'big puppy'."
Hugo Keith, defending.

"It was no doubt a welcome relief."
Mr Keith, on the princess walking her dog in Windsor Great Park two days after the Queen Mother's death.

"By her plea of guilty, the Princess Royal has acknowledged responsibility for the actions of Dotty.
"It is quite clear that her first action after putting Dotty in the boot of the car was to apologise profusely for what had happened."
Mr Keith.

"Both boys were traumatised by the incident."
Anthony Smith, prosecuting.

"Very difficult."
Dog psychologist Dr Roger Mugford describing the Queen's corgis whom he was called in to train after they bit their owner.

"There are lots of things that could be done, whether it be retraining, neutering, muzzling. There is all sort of action that could be taken to tackle the issue."
Dr Colette Kase, of Pet Sense pet behaviour service, London.

"I consider that the owners are extremely responsible and if an order is made I have no doubt they will adhere to it.
"It nevertheless is a big responsibility and they have to be aware that if anything goes wrong, if there is another repeat of what happened on Easter Monday, then that is the end of it."
District Judge Penelope Hewitt.

"Our children have been psychologically affected and are fearful of going out on their own.
"They have become very fearful of all dogs and still have nightmares.
"If the dog had been put down it would have been recognition of this and helped our children psychologically."
Statement by the children's parents given to press after the court case.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Tim Willcox
"In the end the dog was allowed to live another day"
Dickie Arbiter, former royal press officer
"It's the price you pay for being a dog owner"
The BBC's June Kelly
"She looked pretty solemn throughout"

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