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EDITIONS
Friday, 15 November, 2002, 20:18 GMT
Myra Hindley's plea for freedom
Myra Hindley
Hindley: Believed God had forgiven her
Myra Hindley never gave up hope that she would one day be free.

She tried to convince a disbelieving nation that she was an unwilling accomplice in the Moors murders, and should be released.

As she began her campaign for freedom, she set out her arguments in her own words.

No words of mine can ever express the deep remorse and regret I feel for what I was involved in over a quarter of a century ago and for the unpardonable length of time it took me to find the courage and decency to confess my part in those crimes.


I still feel the pain of my guilt

I shall forever carry the scars I sustained through the wounds I inflicted, whether in prison or outside.

But I do believe that God has forgiven me, and I try not so much to look at the past, but to the present and the future.

When Mrs Johnson, the mother of Keith Bennett, wrote to me in 1986, I was devastated by the first realisation of just how desperately those families of the children still missing were suffering.

'Pain'

Followed as this was, by what I believe was a purely coincidental visit by Greater Manchester Police, I knew that I had no choice for the sake of those families and my own peace of mind - even for my salvation - but to confront what I had done and confess, and to attempt some kind of reparation in addition to my imprisonment.


I do believe that God has forgiven me

Whilst I still feel the pain of my guilt, I also know I cannot turn back the clock, and that I can do no more than I have already tried to do.

I am still in contact with the family who, in spite of what the media would have people believe, know that I will never cease to help them in any way I can.

I can only say that it is my hope that I will be treated with the same fairness and justice as would any other life sentence prisoner, however difficult.

'Rock of support'

If every life sentence prisoner had been subjected to the same amount of publicity as I have been, and every family of the victim been as exposed to the media, or sought to circumscribe the length of time the perpetrator should spend in prison, very few life prisoners would be released.


No words of mine can ever express the deep remorse and regret I feel

I will play whatever part is required of me in making my transition to freedom as quiet and successful as possible, and I do believe that nothing is impossible.

By far the most important reason for requesting parole is my mother. She has been a rock of support to me, visiting me as often as possible.

When I am settled outside, she can come to me and we can share some time together before she is too old to appreciate it.

I have no propensity whatsoever to crime, and I am confident that I have the mental and physical ability to make a new life outside.


Key stories

The Moors murderers

Who was Hindley?

AUDIO VIDEO
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