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Wednesday, 6 November, 2002, 01:10 GMT
Burrell gets Sun 'gag'
Paul Burrell
The Sun intends to fight the temporary injuncton
Former Royal butler Paul Burrell has won a High Court order against the Sun newspaper banning it from disclosing information from witness statements he made to police during his prosecution for theft.

Mr Burrell was cleared last week at the Old Bailey of stealing from Diana's estate, the Prince of Wales and Prince William.


Because Mr Burrell did not have to give evidence, none of this material was put into the public domain

David Price, Mr Burrell's solicitor
He has given an in-depth interview to the Mirror, which began publishing it in Wednesday's paper, disclosing that the Queen had warned him to be vigilant about "powers at work in this country about which we have no knowledge".

The Sun, which lost out in the bidding war for Mr Burrell's story, is running a spoiler. The paper questions the state of his relationship with the Princess.

The tabloid has vowed to fight the temporary injunction, which was granted on Tuesday night.

Mr Burrell's lawyers said the Sun, and its publishers News Group Newspapers, were ordered by a High Court judge not to report any further details contained in statements Mr Burrell made during his prosecution.

The injunction bans the publication of two of the former butler's witness statements.

Paul Burrell
Mr Burrell has spoken to the Mirror but not the Sun
Barrister Korieh Duodu said Mr Justice Eady ordered no material be published to create the impression Mr Burrell had disclosed information from the statements to the media.

Some details of a statement Mr Burrell gave police about his life with the royals were reported in the Sun on Monday.

The Sun's legal representatives had argued further material should be published "in the public interest".

David Price, Mr Burrell's solicitor, stressed the injunction did not affect material "already in the public domain".

But he added: "In Tuesday's issue of the Sun, substantial extracts were published from a confidential witness statement that had been prepared by Mr Burrell's lawyers for the purposes of the criminal trial.

"Because Mr Burrell did not have to give evidence, none of this material was put into the public domain.

"Much of it is very sensitive and that is why Mr Burrell went to court today."

Under the order, no other media can refer to further contents of the statements made by Mr Burrell.

The Sun has vowed to fight the injunction "at a future court hearing in the next few days".

A legal spokesman said in the newspaper: "We are naturally disappointed the interim injunction was granted. But we will continue fighting the matter."


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04 Nov 02 | Politics
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