BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 28 October, 2002, 06:52 GMT
MoD to review Army training regime
Deepcut barracks in Surrey
Deaths at Deepcut prompted calls for an inquiry
The Ministry of Defence is to carry out what it calls an "in depth reappraisal" of training procedures in the armed forces.

It has ordered the review amid growing controversy surrounding the deaths of four young soldiers at Deepcut training camp in Surrey.

The inquiry will look at whether the training of recruits is too harsh and whether there is too much scope for bullying and sexual harassment.

Pte James Collinson
James Collinson's body was exhumed this month
It comes as up to 40 families, whose children died while serving in the Army in a non-combat situation, prepare to lobby Westminster on Tuesday.

They are pressing for a public inquiry into the deaths of four young squaddies who died at Deepcut barracks. The Army said they committed suicide.

The review is unlikely to directly address Deepcut but is the first sign the MoD has been feeling the heat on the issue, BBC defence correspondent Andrew Gilligan said.

The review is expected to take about two months.

Private James Collinson, 17, from Perth, died from gunshot wounds earlier this year.

Parents' pressure

Pressure from his parents, Jim and Yvonne, led to the exhumation of his body earlier this month for a second post-mortem examination.

Geoff Gray from Seaham in County Durham died at the base last year, while Sean Benton from Sussex, and Cheryl James, from north Wales, died in 1995.

The police reopened the investigation into all four deaths after pressure from the parents.

Police must now find hard evidence that deaths are suicides before handing responsibility back to the military.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Andrew Gilligan
"It's unlikely to satisfy the Deepcut parents"

Key stories

Background

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes