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Friday, 25 October, 2002, 18:59 GMT 19:59 UK
'No reason' for butler to have photos
Paul Burrell
Burrell arrives at the Old Bailey
Princess Diana's butler had no legitimate reason to have personal photographs she owned and which police found at his home, her sister has told a court.

The Old Bailey heard how last year police showed Lady Jane Fellows a photo album of items taken from Paul Burrell's home.

She said she could think of no reason why he thought they belonged to him.

Lady Jane Fellows
Lady Fellows: Burrell had no right to Diana's items
Mr Burrell denies stealing more than 300 items from the princess, the Prince of Wales, and Prince William.

The court also heard from PC Kevin Ward who was on duty at Kensington Palace after Princess Diana died.

He said that at about three o'clock one morning he had seen Mr Burrell remove a mahogany box and two dresses from the princess's apartments and place them in his car.

When asked what he was doing, Mr Burrell replied that he had been told by her family to destroy some items.

He told the jury: "I said 'do you not think it inappropriate at this time of night'?

"He said it had to be discreet."

Agitated behaviour

PC Ward told the jury he had been left "very agitated" afterwards.

He said he saw Mr Burrell arrive in his estate car and later saw him coming out from the alley with a mahogany box.

He said: "It was very polished wood - like a presentation box with brass fittings - about three feet long, one foot wide and one foot deep.

"It was placed into the back of the car up against the back seat and a blanket placed over it."

He said Mr Burrell was also carrying two dresses in a plastic bag.


What you saw, although right to make a mental note and report it to superiors, was not a suspicious incident at all

Lord Carlile QC, defence counsel
He said he had not thought what was going on was appropriate and had spoken to his controller.

The court heard how police later showed the officer photographs of items and he had said "with certainty" that a dress shown in them was a dress he had seen that evening.

Lord Carlile QC, defending, suggested to PC Ward that Mr Burrell "at least in the early part of the time you were serving there, had a permit and, subject to showing it, could come and go as he pleased and not have to give a reason to a police officer."

Lord Carlile then asked the witness about what he described as the "nocturnal incident" when Burrell arrived in his car and took items from Kensington Palace.

"He wasn't wearing shades, or a hat, or a scarf around his face, was he?" Lord Carlile asked.

"No," said PC Ward.

Lord Carlile added: "He was instantly recognisable as Paul Burrell by his car and his person.

"He turned his car round so he really couldn't have made himself more obvious?"

"That's correct," PC Ward answered.

Car confusion

The officer agreed there were CCTV cameras and other security alarm systems covering Kensington Palace and that checks on who was coming and going and reporting this to senior officers were a routine occurrence.

Lord Carlile said: "What I'm putting to you is that what you saw, although right to make a mental note and report it to superiors, was not a suspicious incident at all."

"No, it was a suspicious incident," the officer replied.

He agreed he was never told there were limitations on the defendant entering the premises at any time of night.

In his statement made on 16 November 2000, PC Ward said the vehicle Burrell was driving was a blue Ford Escort.

However, Lord Carlile said: "But he never drove a Ford Escort."

PC Ward said: "It is my mistake."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Nicholas Witchell
"(Mr Gibbins said) Paul Burrell was trusted implicitly by the Princess"

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25 Oct 02 | Scotland
17 Oct 02 | England
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