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Thursday, 17 October, 2002, 04:46 GMT 05:46 UK
Diana butler trial to restart
Paul Burrell
Burell arriving at the Old Bailey on Wednesday
The trial of Paul Burrell, former butler to Diana, Princess of Wales is set to restart with a new jury on Thursday.

The original jury at the trial of Paul Burrell, former butler to Diana, Princess of Wales, was dismissed by the judge on Wednesday.

Less than 90 minutes later the new jury was sworn in, to begin hearing the case against Mr Burrell at the Old Bailey on Thursday morning.

The decision to restart the trial three days after it began was made after a morning of detailed argument in court, but the reasons cannot be published due to legal restrictions.

Mr Burrell, 44, denies stealing more than 300 items which belonged to Diana, Princess of Wales, Prince Charles and Prince William.

'Clean slate'

Before the new jury was sworn in the seven men and five women were warned that the trial could last up to six weeks.

Mr Burrell with a painting of Diana, Princess of Wales
Diana once described Mr Burrell 'my rock'
They were also asked whether they, or any of their friends or family, had ever worked in a royal household or a police service.

Mrs Justice Rafferty also told the jury: "I would be surprised if you have not read reports of the case so far and it is no secret that I, for legal reasons, discharged an earlier jury."

She warned them that they must put anything they have read, heard or seen out of their minds, to give Mr Burrell a fair trial.

"Give yourselves a clean slate and now concentrate on what you are now here to do, which is to consider the evidence, not what is reported as having been said," Mrs Rafferty said.

Calm

It is thought that the aborted trial is likely to have cost up to 30,000.

Mr Burrell appeared calm at the unexpected turn of events, watching from the dock of court number one.

He stood and glanced towards the new jury as the charges were outlined.

Mr Burrell is accused of stealing items including ornaments, personal family photographs, intimate letters from Diana to William, and clothing, including some of her nightwear.

Although there are dozens of witnesses to be heard in the trial, including Diana's sister and her mother Frances Shand Kydd, it is not expected that the Prince of Wales or Prince William will give evidence.

See also:

16 Aug 01 | UK
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