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Friday, 27 September, 2002, 11:21 GMT 12:21 UK
'Why I'll be marching'
A 2001 anti-war march in London
More than 100,000 people are expected to attend an anti-war march in London on Saturday. Here some of them give their reasons for attending.


Every Muslim feels for another Muslim suffering elsewhere in the world. We can't physically go to help the Iraqis, but UK Muslims can raise our voices.

The Iraq issue is the tip of the iceberg, Muslims are being persecuted around the world. There is an agenda against us.

I am also marching to show solidarity for the Palestinians. Many Muslims feel if that issue was solved, the problems in other Muslim countries would be solved too.


I hope the US and UK will start to hear [Muslim] voices

Abu-Zar Aziz
The media doesn't give us the attention we deserve. We have staged many large rallies with no coverage, while last week's countryside march was shown everywhere - on the BBC, Sky, everywhere.

The Muslim community is criticised for not coming together, but we've organised for this march. It will bring together Muslims from all backgrounds and origins.

We've felt ignored and hopeless in the past, but now we'll show we are united. I hope the governments of the US and UK will start to hear our voices.


I'd call myself a pacifist and am against war in general - I demonstrated against the wars in Kosovo and Afghanistan - but I am especially opposed to bombing Iraq.

Heather Cox
Heather Cox: 'I think America is just picking on Iraq'
I think America is just picking on Iraq to show how powerful it is. Saddam wasn't removed during the Gulf War, so I don't think another war will accomplish that aim.

When I've been out leafleting, people have seemed less convinced about attacking Iraq than they were about the war in Afghanistan. Then they saw a connection with 9/11.

I'd like to think Tony Blair isn't like Bush and that he actually wants the support of the people for a war.

I hope that if lots of people march it will make him think we should go further down the diplomatic route. It may also push wavering MPs to actually speak out against a conflict.


My primary motivation is that war is an abomination, and should definitely be a last resort - not just something that is included when politicians say 'We're exploring all the avenues'.


I hope enough people turn out to make the point that [Tony Blair] should listen to us

Nancy Godwin
For me there isn't enough compelling proof there that Saddam Hussein poses an immediate and global threat.

I don't want to see the US taking unilateral action - anything that is done should be through the UN. I wonder if the US has a hidden agenda. What's their issue with oil?

Tony Blair seems to have gone through this in a gung-ho manner. I've never been on a march of any sort before, but I hope enough people turn out to make the point that he should listen to us.


I've voted Labour in the past two general elections. My parents have always been more left wing than me, and they don't like Blair, but I've thought he should be given a chance. But on this I don't see how he can possibly justify it.

Oliver Woodward
Oliver Woodward: 'I don't see why we have to back the US government'
I don't see why we have to back the US Government. We didn't get involved with Vietnam. The Germans don't feel like they have to go along with the Americans. So why should we?

The issue of Iraq should be decided by the surrounding countries in the Middle East. I can't say I'm an expert on this, but I think this is all to do with America's strategic position in the region.

I really don't know if other people in the country agree with me, but I hope there are lots of us on the march, and our message goes out clearly.


I've never been on a march before but I shall be there on Saturday protesting about Britain's gung-ho attitude and subservience to US policy.


Double standards and hypocrisy are not noble traits worth fighting for

Edmund Graham
It's immoral how Blair and Bush think that they can run roughshod over international law, while simultaneously claiming to be paragons of virtue.

It's all about oil and shoring Israel up. There's scant condemnation of Israel or the US's appalling human rights record. Both have weapons of mass destruction along with China, but I don't see Britain sabre-rattling over any of these regimes.

Double standards and hypocrisy are not noble traits worth fighting for. Let's just simply bomb all those who aren't 'civilised', starting with Guantanamo Bay, it'd save a lot of debate.


Key stories

The 'evidence'

IN DEPTH

TALKING POINT
 VOTE RESULTS
Iraq peace march: Do you support it?

Yes
 77.13% 

No
 22.87% 

16424 Votes Cast

Results are indicative and may not reflect public opinion

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