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Tuesday, 24 September, 2002, 09:13 GMT 10:13 UK
Iraq dossier in pictures
Key pictures from the UK Government's dossier on Saddam Hussein's weapons programme.

Photograph of children's bodies, found dead where they had been playing in their village of Halabja. It was bombed by Iraqi warplanes in March 1988 when Saddam Hussein used chemical weapons against his own people. "In places," the dossier says, "streets were piled with corpses."

 

The Ibn Sina Company and Tarmiyah, one of a number of centres which the dossier says are "dual-use facilities, which are capable of being used to support the production of chemical agent and precursors".

 

Project Baiji in north-west Iraq at al-Sharqat which, the dossier says, is a former uranium enrichment facility which was damaged during the Gulf War and rendered harmless under supervision of the IAEA, but part of which has been rebuilt as a chemical production complex.

 

The dossier says that Iraq has attempted to modify the L- 29 jet trainer to allow it to be used as an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) which "is potentially capable of delivering chemical and biological agents over a large area".

 

The solid propellant Ababil-100, which the report says is under production, probably as an unguided rocket. It says there are also plans to extend its range to at least 200km. 

The dossier claims intelligence sources say Iraq has retrained up to 20 al-Hussein missiles (pictured right), in breach of UN Security Council Resolution 687. "They could be used with conventional, chemical or biological warheads and, with a range of up to 650km, are capable of reaching a number of countries in the region including Cyprus, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Israel."

 

The Al-Rafah/Shahiyat liquid propellant engine static test stand at letter A which, the report says, is larger than the one for al-Samoud missiles (B), and the one formerly used for testing SCUD engines (C) which was dismantled under UNSCOM supervision. "This new stand will be capable of testing engines for medium range ballistic missiles (MRBMs) with ranges over 1,000km, which are not permitted under UN Security Council Resolution 687."

 

Map showing ranges of current missiles: al-Samoud and Ababil-100 missiles at 150km, and al-Hussein missiles at 650km. Planned or potential missile ranges are al Abbas at 900km, and a medium-range ballistic missile at 1,200km.

 

A "presidential site" or "palace", which Iraq barred UN weapons inspectors from in 1997. The dossier says: "Many of these so-called 'palaces' are in fact large compounds which are an integral part of Iraqi counter-measures designed to hide weapons material." The white block in the middle is the equivalent area of Buckingham Palace and its grounds.


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