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Sunday, 22 September, 2002, 04:26 GMT 05:26 UK
Prince Charles' countryside 'concerns'
Papers
As thousands of protestors ready themselves for Sunday's Countryside March in London it is reported that the Prince of Wales has been far from silent on the issue.

The Mail on Sunday and the News of the World are among a number of papers to report that he has written to Tony Blair to express his dismay at the way the government is treating rural communities.

According to the Mail, he has accused the prime minister of discriminating against country folk in a way that he would not dare treat other minorities.

Milly murder hunt

Detectives searching for the killer of Milly Dowler are convinced he is a local man, according to The Sunday Mirror.

It says thousands of men living within a 20-mile radius of the Hampshire forest where her body was found face questioning by police.

The Independent on Sunday reports that an expert on sex offenders has given detectives the name of a man he believes is a key suspect.

The man is reported to have a record of abducting and raping young girls but is not listed on the main national sex offenders register.

First scalp?

According to the Observer, the controversy over this year's A-level results is about to claim its first scalp.

It says ministers will demand the resignation of the head of the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, Sir William Stubbs.

Meanwhile the most senior government adviser on exams has told the Sunday Telegraph that the A-level should be scrapped.

Professor David Hargreaves says it should be replaced with something along the lines of the baccalaureate in France where students have to study six subjects as part of one overall exam.

Dossier to reveal all?

There is continued speculation about the government's long-awaited dossier of evidence against Saddam Hussein - due to be published this week.

According to the Sunday Times the report will not contain conclusive proof that he has acquired nuclear weapons but it will show that Baghdad has the capability of launching chemical and biological attacks.

The Observer says the dossier will show that Saddam masked his activities behind a series of front companies, smuggling networks and middlemen, all paid for by illegal oil transactions.

Easing up

Kent police are calling for tougher laws to prevent French motorists who speed on British roads from escaping prosecution.

According to the Mail on Sunday, foreign drivers are usually let off with a caution because the costs of making them return to Britain for a hearing would outweigh any fine.

Diplomatic spat

To return, finally, to the countryside march, the Sunday Telegraph reports on a family of foxes living in the grounds of the Finnish embassy in London..

Although prized by the Finnish ambassador, who is a skilled nature photographer, they have caused some cross-border tension with the neighbouring Russian embassy.

The Russian ambassador is convinced, apparently, that the Finnish foxes have been making off with his tennis balls.

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