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Friday, 23 August, 2002, 03:04 GMT 04:04 UK
Botched DIY 'costs 850m a year'
DIY
DIY disasters cost an average of 400 to put right
Householders spend 850m every year calling in professionals to repair damage caused by botched DIY attempts, according to a survey.

The jobs most likely to need rescuing are fixing leaking pipes, fitting new light sockets, unblocking drains, bleeding radiators and repairing domestic appliances.

DIY disasters cost an average of 400 to put right and more than a third of householders admit to them, the British Gas HomeCare research suggests.


While it is tempting to have a go, it is safer and wiser to call in the professionals

Johanna Bond, British Gas HomeCare

Almost seven out of every 10 householders put off calling a professional because they believe they can do it themselves, it indicates.

Johanna Bond, of British Gas HomeCare, said: "While it is tempting to have a go, it is safer and wiser to call in the professionals."

The most feared mistake is apparently a plumbing disaster in the kitchen.

Painting a room and hating the colour comes second, with collapsing shelves not far behind.

A separate study suggests DIY can damage relationships.


In their desperate bid to capitalise on the housing boom, many are getting into hot water with their home improvement projects

NFB chief executive Tony Maynard

One in every three couples say it causes rows, according to research by the National Federation of Builders (NFB), for house builder Laing Homes.

The survey also indicates one in every three homeowners is currently planning a home improvement or building project, with more than a quarter doing so to increase the value of their home.

NFB chief executive Tony Maynard said: "People want to invest time and money in their homes to try and boost the desirability and resalable value of their home.

"But in their desperate bid to capitalise on the housing boom, many are getting into hot water with their home improvement projects.

"Poor quality building and home improvement work can actually reduce the value of your house and put a prospective buyer off altogether."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Mandy Baker
"The DIY bug is catching"
See also:

08 Jan 02 | Health
18 Mar 01 | UK
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