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Friday, 12 July, 2002, 10:12 GMT 11:12 UK
Quiz of the week's news
Thousands of news events happen every week. But in BBC News Online's quiz, there are just seven questions on seven days' news.

If you don't do very well this week, try again next Friday - this quiz is here every week.

Costing £8m today, what could you have had for a mere £40 in 1942?
A: Lock Keeper's Cottage in Bow, known to TV viewers as the former Big Breakfast house
B: A Michelangelo chalk drawing of a menorah, unearthed in the archive of a New York museum
C: A repair job on a holed Royal Navy destroyer
What was described by Nature magazine as “most important find in living memory”?
A: Twin albino hedgehogs, now at Derbyshire’s Prickly's Patch Rescue Centre
B: The seven million-year-old skull of a human-like sahelanthropus tchadensis
C: That UK tap water is safer than ever
“Steven Spielberg couldn't come up with something like this.” Who thinks their brush with the courts is stranger than fiction?
A: US Vice President Dick Cheney, who’s being sued for alleged fraudulent accounting practices
B: Aliyu Ibrahim, who’s demanding a Nigerian Islamic court execute him for blasphemy
C: Barbara Ferrell, who’s trying to stop her brother freezing the body of their baseball legend father Ted Williams
“We know that if we could we'd like to keep them all.” Who, in an ideal world, would want to retain the status quo?
A: New Leeds football boss Terry Venables, who’ll have to sell players in order to keep his World Cup star Rio Ferdinand
B: French farmers' union leader Jean-Michel Lemetayer, who’s resisting the end of EU farm subsidies
C: The board of Scottish Natural Heritage, who may have to cull 5,000 Outer Hebrides hedgehogs to save local birds
“They were not lusty moans. They were as if someone was in need of help.” Who turned out to be romantically waving, not drowning?
A: Ronnie Biggs, the ailing train robber who married his Brazilian lover in prison
B: Lyuba the baby giraffe, flown from Florida to Moscow Zoo to mate with a seven-year-old Samson
C: Two German hedgehogs, found playing noisy “preliminary love games” by alarmed police
According to President Bush: “Sometimes things aren't exactly black and white when it comes to…”
A: “urban policing” - following a video showing LAPD officers roughly treating a black boy
B: “accounting procedures” - following claims he may have been involved in corporate dodgy dealing
C: “Michael Jackson” - following the singer’s claim to be the subject of a racist hate campaign
Who is considering exile after being branded a "past-his-prime pop pervert"?
A: Michael Jackson, subject of a "conspiracy" for - he says - outselling Elvis and the Beatles
B: David Bowie, counter-attacked by Robbie Williams after he called the young star a "cruise ship” entertainer
C: George Michael, damned by the New York Post for his “anti-American” Shoot the Dog video


Tales from the tabloids this weekPlanet Tabloid
Fantastic stories - plus our pun competition
See also:

05 Jul 02 | UK
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