BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 27 June, 2002, 09:04 GMT 10:04 UK
India travel warning eased
Tourists photograph Indian woman
Tourists have been advised to stay away from India
The prospect of tourists returning to India in large numbers has come a step closer, after the British Foreign Office reduced the severity of its warning against travel to the country.

British nationals, who had previously been urged to leave India, are now being asked to consider whether they actually need to remain.

They are also being advised to monitor developments in its stand-off with Pakistan over the disputed Kashmir region.

Tourists and other people planning non-essential trips to India are still being advised to stay at home.

Terrorist attacks

The advisory against travel to India was issued in June, at a time of military stand-off between India and Pakistan and the "increased risk of conflict".

There were fears that if fighting broke out it could escalate rapidly, with the possibility that nuclear weapons could be used.

Despite the changes to its advice, the Foreign Office said it still strongly advises "against travel to all parts of the state of Jammu and Kashmir".

It said Gujarat remains unsettled following the outbreak of serious violence in late February 2002.

And visitors to all parts of the country "should be aware that there is a risk of terrorist attack in India, particularly in the vicinity of key government installations".

Many British companies in India have ordered their employees to leave, and diplomatic offices were scaled down to minimum staffing levels.

Diplomatic staff

Tensions between India and Pakistan have eased since in recent weeks, and the threat of war seems to have receded.

The new Foreign Office advice is in line with a similar move by the United States, which has also downgraded its warning from advice to leave to advice to avoid non-essential travel.

The Foreign Office has advised against all non-essential travel to Pakistan since 11 September, and reduced its diplomatic staff on 22 May.

Click here fror background reports and analysis

Key stories

Eyewitness

BBC WORLD SERVICE
See also:

31 May 02 | UK Politics
22 May 02 | South Asia
31 May 02 | South Asia
30 May 02 | UK Politics
26 Mar 02 | UK Politics
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes