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EDITIONS
Tuesday, 25 June, 2002, 09:57 GMT 10:57 UK
R.I.P. Thin Blue Line
THIN BLUE LINE passed away after many decades on the beat.

Born in the 1920s, the standard issue navy blue tunic of the British police officer witnessed the highs and lows of British life.

Suffolk police are the first to take up the successor to bobbies in blue
Pc Dave Tobin: Bobbie in fluorescent yellow
Its successor will be the more visible Thin Fluorescent Yellow Line, as modern reflective tunics take over from the old familiar.

As well as being on the frontline at all times, Thin Blue Line also came under fire either for policing too hard, or for policing too softly softly.

Nevertheless, Thin Blue Line's final weeks were happy ones spent corralling ebullient crowds at jubilee celebrations and at largely peaceful World Cup screenings.

Dixon of Dock Green
Happier times: Dixon of Dock Green in blue (and black and white)
In announcing the passing, a spokesman for the Association of Chief Police Officers appeared to suggest that Thin Blue Line should have taken early retirement. He said that because policing requirements change over time, the traditional tunic no longer served all modern needs.

It is survived by its beloved partner, Police Helmet, which itself has not had a good few months. The 12-inch hat much favoured by souvenir-seekers could shrink by up to a third of its original height. The prognosis is not good. Police Helmet, now almost 140 years old, is said to be wobbly and prone to falling off.

No flowers.


Helmet has nothing to fear. After a long career with the police force, another beckons within the catering industry. Britain today is suffering from a severe lack of jelly moulds.
C Goodwin, Oman

Now we'll never catch another speeder again as they will see us from 1.5 miles away.
A Thompson, UK

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