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EDITIONS
Thursday, 6 June, 2002, 06:28 GMT 07:28 UK
India's Kashmir plans scrutinised
The disputed area of Kashmir is the central point for many newspapers who speculate on India's plans for war.

Under the headline "India plans war within two weeks", the Daily Telegraph focuses on events in the disputed territory of Kashmir.

It says the Indian authorities are planning a campaign which will mirror the American operation in Afghanistan, with air strikes followed by a ground assault involving special forces.

The main thrust of the Indian plans, says the Times, would be to destroy camps of Islamic militants.

Senior Indian military officials have told the paper that they expect the mission to last about a week.

American muscle

The Guardian reports that the Israeli leadership has come under increasing pressure to re-occupy the entire West Bank and expel the Palestinian leader, Yasser Arafat, after Wednesday's suicide bombing in northern Israel.

In an editorial it says the blast in Megiddo should send a message to Washington that it is time for President Bush to use America's diplomatic muscle to help resolve the current crisis.

Still on the conflict front, the Times reveals that the security service has drawn up a secret list of potential terrorist targets in Britain.

It says that fears over possible suicide attacks by the al-Qaeda network prompted the action.

Some 350 key sites have been examined by MI5 officials, according to the paper, including nuclear power stations, oil refineries and communications centres.

Mortgage for life

Several papers look at the effects of the rise in house prices.

The Daily Express is concerned with a warning from lenders that the hike could lead to homeowners taking out 50-year mortgages.

It says if the proposals are adopted it could mean that buyers will be making payments into their 70s and 80s.

The Daily Mail warns that the era of the never ending mortgage has dawned, under the headline, "Spectre of the 50-year Home Loan".

The Daily Mirror is worried that such a move could take us down the same path as Japan where parents leave their homes and their debts to their children.

Dirt digging? The Independent says it has uncovered evidence of an attempt by senior figures at the Department of Transport to gather information aimed at discrediting a survivor of the Paddington rail crash.

Pam Warren made headlines when she accused the former transport secretary, Stephen Byers, of misleading parliament over his decision to place Railtrack in administration.

The paper says an e-mail asking for any information about Mrs Warren was circulated within the Department of Transport and Labour Party headquarters at Millbank.

It claims that while the memo simply requested information, it was widely interpreted by recipients as an attempt "to dig dirt".

Inner-city surgery

The risks faced by those who regularly use swimming pools in Britain are exposed by the Daily Mail

It says a survey has revealed one in seven pools in the public and private sector contains bacteria which could make bathers ill and only half those tested met water quality standards.

The Independent reports that doctors in inner-city hospitals in Britain are to be given training in battlefield surgery techniques to cope with the rising incidence of wounds caused by shootings and stabbings.

Medical staff from two London teaching hospitals are to be sent on a course normally used to prepare military surgeons for frontline service in the Balkans and Afghanistan.

Firemen's steps

The Sun is concerned about new safety rules for fire-fighters in Gloucestershire which will force them to use the stairs instead of their traditional poles as they rush to emergency calls.

Fire chiefs say the move has been taken to reduce the number of injuries.

But the Sun fears that the move might shatter the macho image of fire fighters sliding into action to put out a blaze.

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