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Thursday, 21 March, 2002, 20:16 GMT
Damilola's friend 'bullied by brothers'
Damilola Taylor
Damilola Taylor bled to death in a stairwell
A schoolboy friend of Damilola Taylor has told a court how he had been bullied by two brothers accused of the murder.

The 14-year-old said Damilola might have been with him on one occasion when he was pushed against a wall.

And the brothers had given them "dirty looks" as they passed them playing football in a local park, he told the Old Bailey.


He kept saying: 'I want to see my brother, let me see my brother. He will talk, he will talk'

Anne McMorris, outreach worker
The boy was one of the last witnesses in the prosecution case, which ended on Thursday, but the first to imply Damilola was known to the brothers, who are now 16.

He said: "When I used to play football, I used to see them walk past us and give us dirty looks."

The boy, who was at school with the brothers, said he was regularly bullied and abused by them. He had been kicked and punched three or four times.

Stabbed with bottle

Damilola bled to death from a thigh wound caused by a broken bottle in November 2000, just three months after his family moved to England from Nigeria.

The prosecution says his death was borne out of callous bullying and a robbery which went wrong.

The brothers and a 15-year-old youth deny murder, manslaughter and assault with intent to rob.

Earlier, social worker Anne McMorris told of the distress of one of the defendants when he realised he had been separated from his brother while on remand at Feltham young offenders institute.

Old Bailey
The prosecution finished its case on Thursday
She said the boy kept repeating: "He can't be left on his own, he'll talk, he'll talk."

She said she had been called to the youth's cell after his brother had failed to return from court in March, last year.

"He said 'I want to see my brother, I want to see my brother - you have to let me see my brother'. He kept repeating it over and over again.

"He was crying, he was very upset. He was very distressed."

She said the youth calmed down when he was able to phone his mother and sister and a prison officer told him his brother had been transferred to another institution.

The trial continues.

Find out more about the Damilola Taylor murder trial

Not guilty verdict

The fallout

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15 Mar 02 | England
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