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Wednesday, 23 January, 2002, 08:46 GMT
Scots put brakes on car phone use
Driver on phone
Scots support a ban on mobile phone use
Scottish motorists are more supportive of plans to ban drivers from using their mobile phones than their counterparts elsewhere in Britain, according to new research.

But drivers north of the border are the least likely to admit to speeding, the survey from the RAC claims.

The annual survey from the motoring organisation is seen as one of the most authoritative sources of information on drivers' views.

Almost six out of 10 Scots supported plans to ban mobile phones while driving, the strongest supporters of such a move in the UK.


There is little doubt that we remain a car dependent society.

Graeme Potts of the RAC
Also more Scots (73%) said they believed roadside cameras were a good speed deterrent, while 13% admitted having points on their driving licence, the second lowest only to London and the south east of England.

Just 25% of drivers north of the border admitted to speeding on the country's motorways and 54% felt most motorists did so, the lowest of any region in the UK.

The report also gives some indication of the challenge the Scottish Executive is facing in its efforts to get more people to use public transport.

The survey claims that one in eight drivers said they would stop driving when they are faced with congestion, compared with one in four in London.

And the RAC said it was worrying that people now seem to be accepting congestion as a way of life.

Traffic congestion

Commenting on the UK-wide findings, RAC group managing director, Graeme Potts, said: "There is little doubt that we remain a car dependent society.

"What is more worrying is that we now appear to accept congestion as a way of life and will generally remain in our cars than seek alternatives."

But 32% of Scots motorists who would stop driving said they would choose to walk, more than any other region in the UK.

Also fewer Scots (15%) think the use of public transport would lead to less traffic congestion, significantly less than anywhere else in the country.

The RAC report on Motoring 2002 also revealed that fewer Scots (16%) admitted being involved in a road accident within the last three years.

M8 queue
Traffic congestion: "A way of life?"
Of those who admitted to being in an accident just 16% admitted liability.

As many as 48% thought speed cameras were just a way of raising revenue for the police and the government.

Scotland also has the fewest woman drivers (38%), compared with the Midlands and East Anglia which have the most (47%).

The survey also found 69% of motorists who had been "flashed" by speed cameras said they have had nothing happen to them afterwards.

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