BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in: Entertainment: Arts
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Showbiz 
Music 
Film 
Arts 
TV and Radio 
New Media 
Reviews 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Wednesday, 23 January, 2002, 01:43 GMT
Motorists escape speed camera fines
Speed cameras
Speed cameras are supported by most drivers
Only one in four drivers flashed by a speed camera has had to pay a fine, a major motoring report from the RAC claims.

It said most of the speeding drivers never receive a fine in the post, while a minority manage to escape conviction.

The survey found drivers believe that more than 70% of motorists speed on motorways, but only 42% are prepared to admit doing so themselves.

The RAC also said most drivers now accept traffic jams as a way of life, with many leaving extra time for delays during their journeys.

Sudden braking

In its annual motoring survey, the organisation suggests speed cameras work as a deterrent against speeding, whether drivers receive a fine or not.

Motoring facts
71% think most drivers speed on motorways
22% say motorway limits 'do not mean much'
78% back the use of speed cameras
69% not fined after speed camera flash
42% want mobile phones banned while driving
Two thirds said they slow down when confronted with a camera - although many said that might cause dangerous sudden braking.

A majority of the 1,800 people questioned supported the use of cameras and their proliferation across Britain.

Despite the public support for the cameras motoring experts suggested they would be far more effective if punishment was swift and certain.

Traffic jams

According to the RAC traffic jams are now seen as unavoidable, with congestion affecting eight out of ten drivers.

Despite the problem most drivers preferred to find a way around the congestion rather than a switch to alternative transport.

Some 24% said they start their journeys earlier, 22% take different routes, and 18% change journey times.

Only 29% were confident to set off on a journey without making any provision for congestion, compared to 41% in the 1997 annual survey.

Two in five blamed congestion on "too many cars on the road", while 18% blamed roadworks and one in ten said public transport was the cause.

Asked to consider which regular weekly car journey they could give up, 29% would not or could not think of one.

See also:

26 Sep 01 | Wales
Website traps speed cameras
02 Aug 01 | UK
Push for more speed cameras
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Arts stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Arts stories