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Wednesday, 21 November, 2001, 14:32 GMT
King 'may have abused more'
Jonathan King
Jonathan King has been found guilty of six offences
Police believe Jonathan King may have abused more schoolboys in the UK and around the world.

King, 56, told the Old Bailey "thousands" of youngsters had visited his home during his 36-year career.


Undoubtedly there are other people out there who may well have been assaulted by King and who have not come forward

Det Insp Brian Marjoram, of Surrey Police

He was jailed on Wednesday for six counts of sexual abuse of five teenage boys.

Following the conviction, police said the number of victims could have been higher.

And they said King asked youngsters to fill in a survey as a device to "groom them for his own purposes."

Detective Inspector Brian Marjoram, of Surrey Police, said: "Undoubtedly there are other people out there who may well have been assaulted by King who have not come forward."

He said he would not like to put a figure on how many other boys may have been victims but they had been given a chance to come forward during the investigation had they wanted to.

'Harrowing'

In court King had said he wrote out 20,000 to 30,000 "market research" lists over the years to find out youngsters' thoughts on "sex, drugs and rock and roll".

But afterwards Mr Marjoram said: "This was certainly used as device by King for him to get in with the boys, to start speaking to them and to groom them for his own purposes".

Copies of the lists found at King's home in Bayswater, west London, revealed some surveys had been filled out in Italian and German, prompting officer's fears that foreign youngsters might have been among his victims.

Mr Marjoram, who worked on the investigation, said justice had been achieved for the victims despite King having the "best defence money can buy".

Mr Marjoram said: "He put these victims through a very harrowing time in court.

"They were accused of fantasising and distorting the truth. King also gave evidence and mocked them. I am happy to say the jury saw through King's deceit."

He added that people deserved justice whether they were assaulted yesterday or 20 years ago.

Along with copies of the 'market research' lists found at King's home, police also found that he had travel bags containing photographs of a naked teenage girl holding a placard reading: "Let's do it."

The prosecution said King used copies of this picture to deceive youngsters into thinking they would be provided with girls for sex.

Youngsters were asked to prioritise subjects on a list including family, sex, music and friends. King would then often suggest that sex should be higher up the list.

He would often pick up victims from London in his Rolls-Royce car, tell them who he was and invite them back to his place to listen to records. Once there he seduced them.

Police arrested King in November last year, after a man made a complaint that he had been abused by the pop mogul when he was a boy.

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