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Sunday, 8 July, 2001, 00:53 GMT 01:53 UK
Royal inquiry text in full
Royal Family
The guidelines have been agreed by the royal family
It is entirely in tune with today's world that members of the Royal Family should be allowed to pursue careers, including in business, if that is what they wish to do.

Being active in business, a member of the Royal Family is helping to generate economic activity, showing skill and enterprise and supporting himself or herself financially.

At the same time, members of the Royal Family have a vital role in supporting the Queen by taking on official engagements throughout the country, in representational work - for example, official visits - in improving the monarchy's accessibility - for example, at local events throughout the United Kingdom - in recognising achievement and success - for example, making awards and visits - and in supporting the voluntary sector - for example, charities and patronages.


Members of the Royal Family have a vital role in supporting the Queen by taking on official engagements throughout the country

Buckingham Palace statement
These activities respond to a constant public demand and there are many more invitations to members of the Royal Family at any time than can possibly be accepted.

Of course there are going to be difficulties. Members of the Royal Family will always be open to accusations of exploiting their royal status and it will never be possible to prevent entrapment, subterfuge, innuendo or unfair allegations.

But this is no reason for not moving forward and accepting that this is a modern challenge for the monarchy and the Royal Family in the 21st century.

Hard and fast guidelines are difficult to lay down because it is clear that circumstances are always likely to be very different and need to be looked at on a case-by-case basis.

It is obviously up to the member of the Royal Family to make their own judgments on how to apply that advice to their own specific circumstances.

They are well aware of the sensitivities.


Of course there are going to be difficulties

Buckingham Palace statement
We have therefore developed an updated general advice to private secretaries to be particularly vigilant to try to minimise risks.

Examples of the sort of advice are, before a member of the Royal Family takes on a new business activity, he or she must ensure that the Lord Chamberlain has been consulted, and the Lord Chamberlain would be expected to advise against accepting an invitation to an engagement which could not be kept entirely separate from any aspects of the business activities of the member of the Royal Family concerned.

We also recognise that much of the responsibility for tighter procedures lies with the business concerned and business colleagues of the member of the Royal Family, and we have made suggestions that the companies consider their own measures.

Companies should consider the appointment of non-executive 'watchdog' directors with specific responsibilities to avoid problems of allegations of exploitation of royal status.

Companies should consider proper managerial, legal and public relations capacity to deal with these risks.

Companies should consider internal guidelines for fellow employees to ensure they are aware of potential difficulties.

This last point is particularly important to ensure that anyone connected with a business activity of a member of the Royal Family should be carefully briefed not to try to exploit, either deliberately or inadvertently, the member of the Royal Family's position, associations or access.

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