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Tuesday, 3 July, 2001, 11:46 GMT 12:46 UK
Pressure to ban National Front march
Anti-Nazi protestors
Anti-Nazi protestors are planning to hold counter rallies
West Yorkshire Police have applied for special powers to prevent a National Front rally being held in Bradford this weekend.

Community leaders in the city are supporting the decision by the police to oppose the rally by the extreme right-wing group on Saturday 7 July.

Bradford City Council will consider the request before passing it to the Home Secretary, David Blunkett, who will make the final decision.

The Trade Union Council and the Anti Nazi League are planning to hold counter-demonstrations in the city on the same day.

Call for resistance

Mohammed Riaz, the Conservative party candidate for Bradford West at the recent election, said the march should be banned.

Mohammed Riaz
Mohammed Riaz: "Democracy has it limits"
"The last thing we want is racial tension between the two communities which have lived side-by-side in the city for nearly 60 years. Democracy has its limits."

Attique Siddique from Bradford's Anti Nazi league said there will be resistance from anti-racists if the march goes ahead.

"There will certainly be an assembly point for anti-racists. It's vitally important that we do have a presence against the National Front."

The local Asian communitiy is said to have strong feelings about the group coming to Bradford.

Manawar Jan Khan from the Manningham Residents' Association said: "I'm sure there will be groups of people wanting to demonstrate that feeling."

Burnley ban

Police and council bosses in Burnley put forward a similar request to the Home Secretary last week.

Mr Blunkett granted the police special powers to ban marches and outdoor meetings in the town until 27 September following race riots.

Under two sections of the 1986 Public Order Act, people who do not respond to orders to move on by police can be arrested.

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29 Jun 01 | UK Politics
National Front targets Oldham
25 Jun 01 | UK Politics
MPs condemn Burnley violence
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