BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 



BBC Midlands Today's Lindsay Doyle
"A trick that began in France"
 real 56k

Wednesday, 20 June, 2001, 16:00 GMT 17:00 UK
Cash point scam spreads
Bank cash point
The victim suddenly finds their bank card is stuck
Thieves are tampering with cash point machines in a scam where the victim's card becomes stuck in the machine.

Police said several thousands of pounds have been stolen so far.

When a card gets stuck the thief pretends to help and encourages the victim to re-enter their PIN.

They then try to persuade the victim that the cash point has "eaten" the card but in fact the thief is able to retrieve it.

cash point being used
The thief takes the card after the victim leaves
It is thought the scam first originated in France and then spread to the south coast of England.

West Midlands Police said it had now arrived in the Midlands.

There were four instances of the con trick at banks in Wolverhampton in one weekend.

There were also a number of incidents in Birmingham.

False friend

A police spokesman said when the victim's card becomes stuck, the criminals claim the same thing happened to them.

"They tell them they know how to retrieve the card," he said.

The "good Samaritan" will then encourage the victim to re-enter their PIN and memorise the number as it is keyed in.

They wait until the user gives up before taking the card out of the machine.

Police are advising people to be careful if their card becomes stuck and someone offers to help.

In this situation the user should not use their PIN while someone is watching, they say.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

18 Jun 01 | Business
Identity theft: stealing your name
01 Jan 01 | Business
Better protection for bank users
16 Sep 99 | Your Money
Mobile phone fraud claims more victims
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories