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Monday, 18 June, 2001, 12:10 GMT 13:10 UK
Curry on two slices of naan, please
A naanwich
The naanwich is a spicy version of the sandwich
A curry in a naan bread is being tried and tested at the Ethnic Food Show 2001 as the successor to the humble sandwich.

The "naanwich" is a more spicy alternative to Britain's favourite snack.

The show at the National Exhibition Centre in Birmingham has more than 150 stalls with spices, pickles, samosas, baltis and stir frys to savour.

Naved Syed, managing director of Eastern Foods, said: "The naanwich is set to blaze a trail for a new kind of snack experience - the sandwich will never be the same again.

The ethnic food market represents one of the fastest growing areas of the UK food and drink industry.

Chocolate-flavoured curry
Chocolate in curry adds a richer texture
The naanwich was devised by Eastern Foods, one of Britain's largest producers of naan and pitta breads, and its sister company Minara Foods.

Mr Syed said: "Anyone involved in the food industry has to innovate constantly if they are to capture the public's imagination and stay one step ahead of the competition."

Four flavour naanwiches are being launched: chicken alloo, chicken tandoori masala, vegetable bhuna and sweet and sour.

Halal meals

The sandwich market is estimated to have been worth 3.2bn in 1999 and is growing at 13% per year.

Chocolate-flavoured curry is another food innovation.

A spokeswoman for Minara Foods said: "Tasting panels have given curry chocolate a unanimous thumbs-up.

The chocolate adds a richness to the traditional curry flavour."

A chef at the European Ethnic Food Exhibition
The show has hundreds of different foods on display
Halal frozen meals are also on display at the show.

They are the brainchild of 32-year-old Naz Ayub, who once worked in a Halal slaughterhouse.

She originally planned to open a Halal butcher's shop in Alum Rock in Birmingham, which has a predominantly Muslim population.

Ms Ayub eventually decided to manufacture frozen Halal burgers for the retail trade.

The new range is being manufactured in Birmingham to a traditional home-cooked Kashmiri recipe.

The European Ethnic Food Exhibition runs until Tuesday.

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See also:

27 Mar 01 | Business
Curry firm creates 1,000 jobs
25 Oct 00 | Health
British 'addicted to curry'
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