BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 5 June, 2001, 14:44 GMT 15:44 UK
Mistake over Dando gun clue 'remote'
Barry George
Barry George denies murdering Jill Dando
Firearm residue found in the coat of the man accused of murdering television presenter Jill Dando was unlikely to have appeared there after the garment was seized by police, a court has heard.

Senior forensic scientist Robin Keeley said the possibility that the coat pocket had been contaminated with traces of ammunition residue while being examined in his laboratory was "remote."

The Cecil Gee coat was taken from Barry George's home for examination after his arrest last year, and taken first to a police photographic studio before being sent to Mr Keeley's laboratory.

Mr George, 41, from Crookham Road, Fulham, west London, denies murdering Miss Dando outside her home in Gowan Avenue, Fulham, on 26 April 1999.

Mr Keeley told the Old Bailey on Tuesday he would have preferred it if the exhibit had gone straight to him, as there was the risk of contamination or that a trace might be lost.

But asked how likely it was that there was innocent contamination of the coat at the studio, Mr Keeley said: "I think it was most unlikely."

Samples taken

Mr Keeley told the court that when he went to Mr George's flat to take samples he found no traces to indicate that guns had been modified there.

"There was no metal work in the samples. The place was fairly grimy and the samples were what you would expect."

Another scientist, Dr Graham Renshaw, said he agreed with Mr Keeling's evidence.

Dr Renshaw, a firearms expert, added that the particle found could not have come from an industrial gun, such as a type used to fire nails into surfaces on building sites.

The trial was adjourned until Wednesday.

See also:

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes