BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Monday, 4 June, 2001, 19:38 GMT 20:38 UK
Dando coat clue 'was from gun'
Barry George
Barry George denies murdering Jill Dando
The jury in the Jill Dando murder trial has heard more evidence about traces of firearm residue found in a coat belonging to her alleged killer.

Senior scientific officer Robin Keeley told the court the residue could have come from the bullet that killed the television presenter. But he could not discount the chance that it came from a firework.

The traces of ammunition were found in the pocket of a coat belonging to Barrie George, 41, from Crookham Road, Fulham, who denies murdering Miss Dando.


The particle in the overcoat pocket was from a firearms ammunition source rather than a fireworks source

Scientific officer, Robin Keeley
When Mr Keeley examined a coat taken from Mr George's home after the murder, he found particles of lead, antimony, barium and aluminium.

Mr Keeley said he could not discount the possibility that the residue could have come from a firework.

But because of its chemical combination, he concluded "the particle in the overcoat pocket was from a firearms ammunition source rather than a fireworks source".

The prosecution alleges that Mr George shot Miss Dando through the head outside her front door in Gowan Avenue, Fulham, west London on 26 April, 1999.

Single fibre

Mr Keeley said the size of the particle was 11.5 microns, impossible to see on a finger.

It was unlikely that a detective walking up to the murder scene could have picked up any of the firearms residue and then contaminated the coat, he said.

Most of the residue would have gone into the wound, he said.

"There was little or no residue available to contaminate anyone in the area apart from paramedics who actually had physical contact with the body," he said.

On Friday the court heard that a single fibre found on Miss Dando's coat after her death matched fibres found on trousers belonging to Mr George.

But the half a millimetre long fibre was too short to extract the dye and split it into its component colours for more precise comparison, the jury heard.

The trial continues.

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes