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The BBC's Graham Satchell
"As the row continues...it is the travelling public who are suffering"
 real 56k

Friday, 30 March, 2001, 07:29 GMT 08:29 UK
Tube services resume
Stranded trains brought to a standstill during the strike
Services are slowly getting back to normal
Rush hour commuters faced delays as London Underground slowly resumed services after a strike by rail workers.

Signalling problems and overnight engineering works caused delays in Central London on Friday on Tube lines including the Jubilee and Metropolitan lines.

And union bosses have warned more strikes could be on the way as they continue to oppose the Government's public private partnership plans for the Tube.


This strike was far more disruptive than the last one because we had a lot of signalling people out this time

London Underground spokesman

The second 24-hour strike by the Rail Maritime and Transport Union employees over jobs and safety brought chaos to the capital.

The strike which began on Wednesday at 2000BST officially ended Thursday night.

Picket lines

But an hour later tube stations remained closed to prepare for getting the service back to normal on Friday.

All but three Tube lines were shut down during the strike.

Only 45 out of a fleet of more than 500 trains were operating.

It is thought to have been hampered by a refusal from members of train drivers' union Aslef to cross picket lines.

An LU spokesman said: "This strike was far more disruptive than the last one because we had a lot of signalling people out this time.

Stations closed

Of the three lines running, only the Metropolitan line operated through central London during the 24-hour stoppage.

There were long queues for buses and heavy congestion on roads on Thursday.

London Mayor Ken Livingstone, who is backing Transport Commissioner Bob Kiley's decision to take legal action over the government's public private partnership (PPP) plan to break up the London Underground, walked to work on Thursday.

The Corporation of London said the strike would cost at least 100m in lost days' work, production and commerce.

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See also:

29 Mar 01 | UK Politics
MPs demand Tube statement
28 Mar 01 | UK Politics
New attack launched in Tube battle
27 Mar 01 | UK Politics
Legal challenge to Tube plans
05 Feb 01 | UK
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Tube sell-off safety threat
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