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EDITIONS
Saturday, 3 March, 2001, 21:31 GMT
Families mourn Selby victims
Letter from Andrew Dunn to his father
Tributes laid at the scene of Wednesday's tragedy
Two young sons of the freight train driver killed in Wednesday's train crash in Selby have left moving tributes to their father.

Andrew, 12, and James, nine, with their mother Mary Dunn, visited the site where two trains crashed on Wednesday killing at least 10 people.

They were amongst five families who made the sad pilgrimage on Saturday to see the tangled wreckage where their loved ones died.

The children laid flowers near the tangled wreckage, with hand-written notes to their father 39-year-old Stephen Dunn.


Almost all those that came down found that it helped but almost without exception they were deeply shocked at the scene of devastation

Tony Thompson
British Transport Police
"To Daddy, I know we had our fall outs but we still loved each other. I promise I will do my best to help mum. I will see you later, love Andrew."

The second read: "Roses are red, violets are blue, I really, really love you. See you in heaven, love from James."

The family live in the nearby village of Brayton.

Police Superintendent Tony Thompson, of British Transport Police had led young Andrew and James to the scene.

"It was very, very difficult for them but they were very brave," he said.

Service held on bridge

"Almost all those that came down found that it helped but almost without exception they were deeply shocked at the scene of devastation," said Mr Thompson.

"Looking at the pictures on television or in the newspapers is nothing like seeing it at first hand."

John Weddle
GNER train driver John Weddle died in the crash
John Weddle, father-of-two from Throckley, near Newcastle - driver of the derailed GNER passenger train - was also killed.

His family spent half an hour on the bridge as British Transport Police chaplain Miles Mitson conducted a service.

Robert Shakespeare, 43, the father of four children aged nine to 17, was travelling from York to London for a business meeting.

The IT manager normally works from his home

His wife Julie Shakespeare paid tribute to the family man of Beverley, East Yorkshire.

"Robert was a loving husband and father, who was devoted to his children. We will all miss him dearly."

The railway 'was his life'

GNER customer operations leader Raymond Robson, 43, from Whitley Bay, Tyne and Wear, has been named as another victim.

His sister, Judith Cairncross, said: "The railway was his life and he loved his job. The early train to London was Ray's favourite and over the years, during shift changes, he did what he could to make sure he kept his place on that run."

GNER customer operations leader Raymond Robson
GNER customer operations leader Raymond Robson lost his life
Mr Robson's wife Lee and mother Mavis have said they do not blame Gary Hart, the driver of the Land Rover that careered on to the line triggering the train crash.

They said their thoughts were with him and his family.

Another victim, church warden Christopher Terry, 30, had been travelling from York to London for a job interview.

His wife Vanessa is being comforted by friends and family at the house they shared with their three-year-old son Benedict.

A chef on the GNER train, Paul Taylor, from the Newcastle area, also died.

Four other victims have yet to be named.

Amazing escape

Also at the site on Saturday was survivor Laurie Gunson, who was trapped in the buffet car for more than an hour before being rescued.

Mr Thompson said: "He was amazed he had escaped alive."

The Archbishop of York, the Right Reverend David Hope, visited the scene and said he had intended to travel on the express but cancelled at the last minute.

A memorial service is being held on Sunday at Hensall parish church, two miles from Great Heck.

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The BBC's Catherine Marston
"Relatives are drawn to the crash site but there is little peace to be found"

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