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Monday, 5 March, 2001, 16:49 GMT
Tributes for 'pioneering' professor
Carriage being lifted
Police lift the mangled wreckage
A university has paid tribute to a professor who has been confirmed as a victim of the Selby rail crash.

Teesside University is mourning the loss of Professor Steve Baldwin, a psychologist who was due to give a speech at the Institute of Psychiatry in London on the day of the disaster.


We have lost an immensely valued and talented colleague

Teesside University

The clinical psychologist - who pioneered research into the controversial children's drug Ritalin - had been missing since the collision between a freight train and an express in North Yorkshire on Wednesday.

Colleagues waited anxiously for news about the 39-year-old bachelor, but he was not identified as one of the victims until Monday morning.

University vice-chancellor Professor Derek Fraser said: "The whole university community is in shock.

"We have lost an immensely valued and talented colleague.

"Our thoughts are with all of those whose lives he touched and who will miss him so much."

Drug research

Professor Baldwin was an acclaimed figure within the international academic community and regularly spoke at major conferences both in the UK and abroad.

His latest project had been to set up a clinic on Teesside to help children and teenagers who had been prescribed the controversial drug Ritalin as treatment for the Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD).

It was the first of its kind in the country and set up to provide alternative treatments to the amphetamine Ritalin.

As part of his campaigning and research he appeared on a BBC Panorama programme.

He graduated from Plymouth Polytechnic and studied at universities in Leicester and Dundee.

Search for bodies

Police believe 10 people died in the crash but say the removal of mangled carriages from the tracks may reveal more bodies.

Crash investigators had been sifting through the wreckage to collect personal belongings to help with identification.

They have now recovered a data recorder in the freight train locomotive, which could provide vital information about the crash.

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