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The BBC's John Thorne
"It could open the doors to other appeals"
 real 28k

Monday, 26 February, 2001, 06:51 GMT
'Tearaway' brothers appeal over ban

The brothers were subject to an Anti-Social Behaviour order
Three brothers are going to the Court of Appeal on Monday to try and overturn a court order barring them from a housing estate in Manchester.

Sean McCann, 16, and his younger brothers Joseph and Michael will claim the ban contravenes European Human Rights legislation.

Last year the brothers were made the subject of one of Britain's first anti-social behaviour orders (ASBOs), under new legislation brought in by the government to fight yob behaviour.

For the first time ever, the Court of Appeal is to move from London to Manchester, to hear the teenagers' pleas.

Failed appeals

Their appeals to the the crown and high courts have already failed.

The brothers, who have legal aid, are asking the Master of the Rolls to overturn a court order barring them from Beswick in east Manchester.

For two years, the brothers are said to have created a catalogue of intimidation, burglary and theft on the housing estate.

Greater Manchester police dedicated hundreds of hours of detective work gathering evidence to obtain the ban.

If it is quashed, it could open the doors to appeals by the subjects of over 140 similar orders imposed on nuisance neighbours and troublemakers.

Last June, Home Secretary Jack Straw told councils in England and Wales to make more use of new powers to crack down on loutish behaviour and nuisance neighbours to help communities "run ragged" by anti-social behaviour.

Speaking at a local government conference in Bournemouth, he urged councils and the police to increase the use of ASBOs.

The orders first came into force in 1999, but councils were at first reluctant to use them.

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