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The BBC's Nicola Carslaw
"Many farmers are not convinced"
 real 56k

Friday, 26 January, 2001, 06:31 GMT
Asda plans to go GM free
asda
Asda has removed GM ingredients from own-label foods
The supermarket chain Asda has announced plans to ensure its chicken, pork and eggs come from animals reared on a diet free of genetically modified ingredients.

It said it had spent the past year forging links with Brazilian soya growers, UK distributors and laboratories to create a non-GM supply base, distribution network and quality assurance scheme.

Asda, which removed GM ingredients and derivatives from its own-label foods 15 months ago also plans to introdue GM-free beef and lamb.

It is the latest in a move by UK supermarkets to eradicate all genetically modified ingredients from eggs, poultry, fish and meat.


Consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of how the food they eat is produced and want, more than ever, to buy products from animals reared on a non-GM diet

Mike Coupe
Asda
On Thursday, Marks & Spencer announced that fresh beef, lamb, chicken, and salmon sold in its stores would not have been fed GM food.

Eggs would also be from chickens fed only on natural products, a spokesman for the ailing high street retailer said.

Almost two thirds of shoppers would prefer to buy products from animals fed non-GM diets, according to an Asda poll of more than 1,000 people.

The company claimed it had received hundreds of letters from customers calling for the removal of GM animal feed from the food chain.

Trading director Mike Coupe said: "The message from customers is loud and clear.

"Consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of how the food they eat is produced and want, more than ever, to buy products from animals reared on a non-GM diet.

"If other retailers follow suit, non-GM animal feed will become the industry standard and the premium charged for it will diminish, as well as the costs to retailers and producers."

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14 Jun 00 | Business
Supermarket or super marketing?
30 Oct 99 | Business Basics
Genetically modified food and consumers
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