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Friday, 19 January, 2001, 14:38 GMT
Beer technology creates 'supermilk'
Milk
Traditional pintas have always had a limited shelf life
A fresh pint of milk is being made to stay fresher for longer thanks to technology first pioneered by the creators of ice beer.

Revolutionary 'PurFiltre' milk is designed to last for up to three weeks, and could put an end to that traditional milk "sniff test".

It is made using a filter process that makers say is the "greatest innovation" in milk production since Louis Pasteur's scientific breakthrough of the 1860s.

Up until now, the only way of making milk stay fresh for longer has been the high heat treatment associated with UHT milk.

Twice the life

In the new process, a ceramic filter removes the bacteria that turn milk sour while leaving all of the milk's natural vitamins and minerals intact.

The milk is then pasteurised in the normal way before being bottled, lasting more than twice as long as the traditional pint.

The filtration technology was first developed to brew the new generation of fashionable ice beers.

More than 4 billion litres of fresh pasteurised milk is bought in the UK every year.

The harmless lactic acid bacteria, that cause milk to sour, survive normal pasteurisation but are removed by the new filter process.

Manufactured by Arla Foods, the product will be on supermarket shelves across most of the UK from next week.

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