BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Sunday, 7 January, 2001, 00:58 GMT
Prince's unlucky breaks
Prince Charles playing polo
Prince Charles has enjoyed playing polo for many years
The Prince of Wales has suffered a number of injuries while pursuing his sporting interests.

The most famous was sustained in June 1990, when he broke his right arm after falling from his horse during a game of polo.

The prince spent three nights in Cirencester Memorial Hospital, Gloucestershire, after the accident in the second chukka of the clash between his side, Windsor Park, and rivals Hildon.

He also received specialist treatment at the NHS Queen's Medical Centre in Nottingham, where he was treated after Saturday's accident.

Prince Charles leaving hospital
The prince needed considerable treatment when he broke his arm
Three months after his fall, the prince needed a second operation because one of the fractures he suffered failed to heal, causing him a lot of pain.

Bone taken from the his hip was packed around the break and a metal plate was secured with screws.

He was discharged from hospital after a week, and within a year he was able to continue playing polo.

However three years later, he was hurt again during a game of polo at Windsor, when he aggravated an old back injury.

He had also been forced to miss Royal Ascot in 1991 because of what his hospital consultant described as a "serious degenerative disc problem", with one disc at the base of his spine prolapsed.

Saturday was not the first time Prince Charles has been hurt while fox hunting.

Prince Charles hunting
The prince's hunting hobby has led to a number of injuries
In January 1998 he broke a rib after falling from his horse during a hunt on the north Wales border.

Despite the discomfort, he insisted on trekking in the Himalayas a few weeks afterwards during an official visit to Nepal and Bhutan.

Three months later he was back in hospital undergoing laser keyhole surgery on his right knee.

It was believed that his troublesome cartilage was caused by the wear and tear of years of sport and exercise.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories