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Wednesday, 27 December, 2000, 17:35 GMT
Harrods drops royal warrants
Workmen outside Harrods
A tradition ended with the removal of royal warrants
Harrods has severed its commercial links with the Royal Family by removing warrants from its prestigious shopfront.

Workmen have taken down the warrants, which show that the Royals buy goods from the store, from outside the Knightsbridge building.

The royal seal of approval was also removed from the store's vans on Wednesday, marking the end of a 62-year tradition.

Harrods owner, Mohamed al-Fayed, chose to end the store's commercial links to the monarchy by taking down all its royal warrants.

Harrods
The Royals no longer shop at the Knightsbridge store
The warrant bearing the Duke of Edinburgh's name had been due to be taken down this week after Mr al-Fayed was told earlier this year that he did not wish to renew his warrant.

The store still had warrants for supplying the Queen, the Queen Mother and the Prince of Wales.

In July Mr al-Fayed told Buckingham Palace he would not be applying for the other warrants to be renewed when they were up for review.

He said then that since neither the Queen, nor Prince Charles had shopped in Harrods for several years, continuing to display the Royal Crescent would be "totally misleading and hypocritical".

By law, he was permitted to use the warrant signs for the Queen and Prince Charles for another year.

The Queen Mother's royal warrant has no expiry date, but has also been taken down.

Allegations

All Harrods packaging and stationery has been redesigned and all vehicles which displayed the warrants have been repainted.

Mohammed al-Fayed
Harrods boss has severed his store's royal ties
Following the death of his son, Dodi, and Diana, Princess of Wales, in August 1997, the Harrods boss made a series of allegations about the circumstances.

The claims were made during his libel battle with former MP Neil Hamilton in the High Court a year ago.

A Harrods spokesman said on Wednesday Mr al -Fayed would be making no further comment on the warrants.

But he had previously said that he was not worried about Harrods losing the royal warrant from the Duke of Edinburgh.

He said he did not need this when he had the support of the masses.

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