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Friday, 1 December, 2000, 14:57 GMT
Painted house row 'toned down'
graphic
Pale imitation: Compromise colours proposed
A compromise may have been struck between a group of homeowners and a Cornish council that took offence at the bright colours residents used to paint their houses.

When the citizens of Penwith first spruced up their homes, the council ordered them repainted or their owners would face fines or prison.


We are optimistic that common sense can prevail

Tim Dwelly
Penzance in Colour
The Georgian properties - falling within a conservation area - had been painted in a variety of colours from lilac to terracotta and from deep blue to green.

But now Penwith District Council has asked members of the homeowners' action group to come up with colours which they think would be more acceptable.

Tim Dwelly, of Penzance in Colour, said: "Following a constructive meeting with Penwith's conservation officer and representatives of English Heritage we are now optimistic that common sense can prevail."

"We have drawn up a draft set of colours, which we are asking the local community to respond to. This list will include colours such as Wedgewood blue, terracotta pink, lilac, ochre and duck egg blue."

Flexible approach

The council originally served the homeowners with enforcement notices ordering that the homes be re-painted in acceptable shades like off-white and magnolia or the owners would face fines of up to 20,000, or even prison.


There can't be a free for all

Roger Harnett, head of council planning
But it has suspended any enforcement action, while negotiations are continuing.

Council officials say they are confident the matter can be resolved.

Roger Harnett, the council's head of planning, said: "The residents accept that there can't be a free for all, but they did want to see a more flexible approach."

Mr Harnett said the council had a statutory duty to protect the conservation area. However only a handful of properties have unacceptable colour schemes.

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18 Aug 00 | UK
Painted house row hots up
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