BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Wednesday, 15 November, 2000, 12:12 GMT
'Compensation culture' here to stay
Belinda Coote
Belinda Coote: Sued her employer for refusing to supply a reference
Three-quarters of consumers in the UK are at ease with the "compensation culture", a new survey suggests.

Nearly three in four people questioned said they would consider pursuing a personal injury compensation claim if they felt it to be someone else's fault.

Individuals are keen to pursue claims against employers but less certain about taking action against the medical profession, according to the survey by Mori.

And despite concerns that a litigious culture to rival the US is rapidly developing in the UK, 78% of people feel claims are socially and morally acceptable.

Costly

In the event that a child suffered a personal injury at school 57% of those surveyed would consider seeking compensation, with only 15% saying they would never sue a school.

Over 60% thought pursuing a claim would probably be more costly than they could afford, but 52% said they would engage a lawyer to do so.

The poll, which was conducted for a personal injury claim company, involved interviews with more than 2,000 adults.

The survey's other findings were:

  • 68% of respondents knew "not very much" or "nothing at all" about how to pursue a compensation claim.

  • 74% said that if they suffered a personal injury at work they felt to be their employer's fault they would be prepared to take their employer to court.

  • 48% of those who answered the survey said they would feel concerned at the prospect of taking their doctor or hospital to court over medical negligence.

  • On average people thought they would have to give 30% of any winning compensation claim to lawyers or the claims company.

  • Women and older people are the most reluctant to pursue medical negligence cases.

  • Search BBC News Online

    Advanced search options
    Launch console
    BBC RADIO NEWS
    BBC ONE TV NEWS
    WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
    PROGRAMMES GUIDE

    Why is 'compensation culture' on the rise?So sue me!
    'Compensation culture' arrives
    See also:

    18 Mar 99 | Health
    Huge rise in GP negligence claims
    Internet links:


    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

    Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


    E-mail this story to a friend

    Links to more UK stories