Page last updated at 15:42 GMT, Friday, 22 August 2008 16:42 UK

Xbox Live in youth voting drive

Heather Smith, Rock The Vote
Smith: Xbox Live is a great way to reach young voters

Americans will soon be able to use Xbox Live to register to vote in the November presidential elections.

Microsoft has signed a partnership with activist group Rock The Vote to boost interest in the upcoming election among young people.

As part of the tie-up Xbox Live members will also be able to take part in polls to gauge their voting intentions.

A forum on Xbox Live will also be used to gather opinions from gamers that will be shared with candidates.

Party politics

"To realise our goal of registering two million young Americans by this fall, we need to go where young Americans are," said Heather Smith, executive director of Rock the Vote, in a statement. "There's no doubt in our minds that many are on Xbox 360 and Xbox Live."

Microsoft said that the Rock The Vote campaign to use Xbox Live would begin on 25 August.

In the past Rock The Vote has also worked with MySpace to encourage bands that promote their music via the social networking site to get fans to register to vote.

Through the partnership with Rock The Vote, Microsoft is also planning to have a presence at the Republican and Democrat party conventions to educate politicians about it and its members views.

Some aspects of Xbox Live are free but for a monthly fee members can take on other console owners in online games. In the UK the annual fee for the service is 39.99.

In May 2008 Microsoft announced that it had 12 million subscribers for Xbox Live spread across 26 countries.


SEE ALSO
Gaming giants look to mainstream
14 Jul 08 |  Technology
Younger viewpoints on politics
29 Jul 08 |  UK Politics
Courting the undecided voters
08 Jan 08 |  Americas
Xbox sets sights on communities
15 Jul 08 |  Technology
Internet key to Obama victories
12 Jun 08 |  Technology
Testing the younger voters' mood
29 Jul 08 |  UK Politics

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