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EDITIONS
Wednesday, 7 August, 2002, 09:24 GMT 10:24 UK
Go Digital: Talk to Tracey
Tracey Logan presents Go Digital
Caught on film: Tracey Logan
Go Digital presenter Tracey Logan is fascinated by the way technology takes on a life of its own outside the research centres.

"The researchers who developed the technology which allowed us all to have mobile phones never envisioned the way in which teenagers are now using them worldwide," she says.

Certainly no one foresaw how regionally and culturally specific the uses of new technologies would become - from nomadic desert herdsmen using satellite equipment to locate the nearest oasis or high-tech toilets in Japan.

Tracey has worked as a presenter and producer for BBC World Service science unit for more than 10 years.

Click here to e-mail Tracey

Her interest in science was sparked at an early age. She was educated in Sciences at Badminton School in Bristol, before going on to Sussex University where she graduated with a degree in African History.


With new technology you can't ever imagine what will happen. It really is beyond your wildest dreams

Tracey Logan
Tracey started her career at the BBC as a sound engineer. She quickly moved to the Science Unit as a reporter writing daily stories for the World Service's 40 or so foreign language sections.

Throughout the 1990s, she worked on the production teams of BBC TV's Tomorrow's World, Radio 4's Woman's Hour and BBC World TV's Science World , but always returning to World Service.

In 1994 she was awarded the BT Technology Journalist of the Year award for her series From Digits To Divas, a history of computer music

Since then, she has watched the information superhighway develop from a radical information exchange to a global marketing tool with massive social and political implications.

"The World Service science unit was there from the beginning covering this revolution and we've seen enormous changes," she says.

"We're going to keep our audiences up to date with what the world of hi-tech is offering, whether they be in business, individuals or communities.

"There is no limit to the content of Go Digital. With new technology you can't ever imagine what will happen. It really is beyond your wildest dreams."


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