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Thursday, 17 August, 2000, 14:06 GMT 15:06 UK
Is it time for a new attitude towards homosexuality in South Asia?

Homosexuality is still illegal in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

South Asia
Films such as "Fire" which pushed the barriers of social acceptability have faced strong criticism in the region.

But isn't it time for South Asia to accept that gay relationships do exist? Should society raise its tolerance of homosexuals? Should gays be given equal rights?

This debate is now closed. Read a selection of your comments below.


Your reaction


Homosexuality in urban India is an open secret

Biswajit, USA/ India
Homosexuality in urban India is an open secret. Though it is illegal, I have never heard of anybody getting punished for it. I lived in Bangalore for almost all of the 1990s and let me tell you there is a big gay population there. There are even gay pubs and bars in this city if you know where to look for them. It is only a matter of time before the law is changed and gays are officially recognised.
Biswajit, USA/ India

I am a 24-year-old gay guy. I am a devout Jain and have lived all my life in Bombay. I came out to my family and some friends after my education was completed and have been living a nice life ever since. In Bombay there is even a gay group that closely interacts with the government and provides specialised health services to gay men.
Sachin, India


I love this earth and all its people

Zafar Shah, India
I was born to Muslim heterosexual parents. This makes me, for the purpose of statistics, a Muslim homosexual. Before anyone bursts a blood vessel or two, let me state that I'm not a practising Muslim. I love this earth and all its people. I've made love to a Hindu, a Jew and a Christian. Perhaps all those who oppose homosexuality should consider outlawing heterosexuality since all "perverts" are born to heterosexuals.
Zafar Shah, India

As a gay Muslim male, I think that the time is long overdue for society in South Asia to come to terms with homosexuality as a reality and a way that we are born.
Omar Khaliq, Pakistan

Islam is all against homosexuality as these are unnatural relationships. Sexual relations are only meant for opposite sex partners with some moral limitations.
Mushtaq Ahmed Memon, Japan

It is a Western phenomenon but that does not mean that South Asians should follow it blindly.
Sanjay, India

As a European it is not my duty to say how other countries should organise themselves; Nevertheless, human rights are the same everywhere and it is time for countries such as India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Bangladesh to fulfil their obligations. Firstly, homosexuality should not be illegal and the law should protect homosexuals from discriminations, torture and violence. Until these basic changes occur, as a Danish citizen I will oppose all co-operation between Europe and countries where my brothers are not respected.
Henrique-José Hansen, Denmark


I believe that as long as the sexual act is consensual, there shouldn't be any objection

Vibha, India/ UK
Homosexuality is not a new phenomenon, there has been historical research on this subject. Many prominent Indians are openly homosexual and in recent years there have been also reports on lesbian relationships. However, I would like to add that unfortunately, a number of supposedly well-informed Indians are also quite uneasy about homosexuality. I believe that as long as the sexual act is consensual, there shouldn't be any objection.
Vibha, India/ UK

I consider myself a Muslim and the world out there that is ignorant of Islam and fears it, should know that a Muslim does not have any nationality or race. A Muslim is just a Muslim - Islam is universal in that sense. Where homosexuality is concerned, Muslims throughout the world are not immune from this. Yes, homosexuality is "haram" (completely illegal) in Islam but the reality is far from true. Although, there is nothing wrong with Islam, there is everything wrong about Muslims. After all they are human beings too.
Anonymous, Britain

Gay people are doing nothing wrong so why reprimand them?
Suren, New Zealand

I see homosexuality as a sickness, so we just need to look for the cure.
Kaleemuddin, Canada

People here say that Muslims will not accept homosexuals. I personally wonder why I see so many homosexuals and transsexuals in so many Muslim countries that I have visited? Much more than in any other religious-dominated area.
Miklos Nomad, Hungary

Homosexuality's justifiability becomes controversial when it comes to the issue of continuity of society which is based on "procreation". Does homosexuality allow for this? What if everybody takes up homosexuality? What will happen to continuity? Nature is the ultimate decider.
MS, Sri Lanka


Criminals exists everywhere in the world. It does not mean that they should be encouraged and accepted by the society

Dinesh Pathak, Nepal (presently in Japan)
Criminals exists everywhere in the world. It does not mean that they should be encouraged and accepted by the society. Likewise, homosexuality is against the nature and it will lead the society in wrong direction. This is a psychological problem. There is no question that the South Asian society which has high valued moral and social ties can accept such activities which even does not exist in other animals. The South Asian culture and society can teach many things to the so-called modern western society.
Dinesh Pathak, Nepal (presently in Japan)

Speaking as a person of Indian origin, it's blatant denial to turn a blind eye to centuries of close, intimate, same-sex bonding in India and many other gender-segregated cultures. The burgeoning lesbi-gay movements in many parts of South Asia and elsewhere are creating contexts in which "the love that dare not speak its name" is being slowly but surely pushed into arenas of public discourse. This is a mixed blessing, since the old closeted homosexual underground was slyly winked at, ignored, or even tolerated, whereas the new gay self-assertion is often met with a backlash of repressive hostility and finger pointing.
Yet, if the new gay movements keep it up, the misery of closeted lesbian and gay people, often trapped in loveless heterosexual marriages and living out a painful lie might cease.
Raj Ayyar, USA


In a society like ours which believes in the popular notion of MARDANGI or manliness, homosexuality will remain a stigma

Sherry Peerzad, Pakistan
Homosexuality does exist in South Asia but in a different context. As a sociologist, I know that homosexuality in South Asian context means a second preference for sex. Even for those who practise it, homosexuality is not a way of life or an ideology. In majority of cases, sexual relationship between man and another man in South Asia are like client-patron relationship. In more general terms, I will say this kind of sexual relationship is usually between male prostitutes and their male clients. This relationship does not involve a desire for companionship. In a society like ours which believes in the popular notion of MARDANGI or manliness, homosexuality will remain a stigma.
Sherry Peerzad, Pakistan

Homosexuality is not an activity, nor a choice of a lifestyle. It is who we are. For whatever reason God only knows, we are sexually attracted and responsive to members of the same sex. We have no control over it. Consequently, we fall in love with people of the same sex and wish to share our lives with someone of the same sex. If Islam kept no room for us, then we have no room for Islam or any other religion. Countries like Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Afghanistan can start by evolving out of their puritan shells and begin to see the world as it is.
R, USA


Homosexuality is not a life style, it is a form of mental disease

Tasbir Alam, USA/Bangladesh
I am totally at ease with gays. I have many friends who are gay and they are wonderful people. We just need to accept that there are many different kinds of people in the world.
Yasmine, USA

Homosexuality is not a life style, it is a form of mental disease. I believe sooner or later scientists will find out the abnormal gene which causing this illness. It was never accepted and won't be accepted in South Asia. It should be considered as a crime as well.
Tasbir Alam, USA/Bangladesh

Sexuality is a gift from God. Used as he directs in Holy Scripture and your life will be blessed and strengthened. Misused and your life and the life of society as a whole will be harmed and ultimately destroyed. The only honourable and healthy sexuality is within a life long committed marriage between a man and a woman.
Jim Mather, USA

Everyone as a 'human' should be given equal rights as 'humans' only, sexuality is a private matter and shouldn't be flaunted in the open whether homo or hetro.
SN, Pakistan

We should never show intolerance towards people, but we should show intolerance to behaviour that is wrong. If homosexuality is wrong, the behaviour should not be tolerated.
AT, US

Well, it would be like hiding the truth if I would depict that there is nothing like homosexuality existing in Pakistan. I have witnessed it myself at dance parties. Well, i was shocked initially to witness this in Pakistan but it does exsist.
Zeeshan Ali, Pakistan


"Gay" is not something that proliferated overnight in South Asia.. it's always been around

S.Dhanapala, Canada
A resounding "yes"... "Gay" is not something that proliferated overnight in South Asia.. it's always been around.. The only reason South Asia has not had to look it squarely in the face is because of the outdated Victorian morals it still clings to, somewhat desperately and with some futility. So yes, like we accept the multitude of religions and peoples in S.Asia, let us also acknowledge that gay people exist and accept them for what they are.. people..
S.Dhanapala, Canada

There is absolutely no excuse for homosexuality. No other animal in the world practices it. Only man has fallen to the depths of immorality to take it up as a way of life. My view is that this 'topic' remains where it started, in the West. We, in Southeast Asia prefer women as partners for marriage. Not 'relationships'...marriage. Always have...always will. In my opinion and in the opinion of the vast majority of Southeast Asians, let well enough alone.
W Afzal, US/Pakistan

Public display of relationship be it homosexual or heterosexual is generally uncomfortable in the Indian Subcontinent. The media or public in India does not actively hunt homosexuals. As far as legal rights are concerned the subcontinent has more pressing issues due to centuries of its neglect.
Vinod Dawda, UK


A person can not be a Muslim and gay at the same time. When a person openly accepts and behaves "homosexual" s/he is out of the fold of Islam

Omar, Canada
A person can not be a Muslim and gay at the same time. When a person openly accepts and behaves "homosexual" s/he is out of the fold of Islam. According to Prophet Muhammad, homosexuality being so common and open is another sign of the coming of the Last Day. I seek refuge in Allah from such an abomination.
Omar, Canada

I'm a little confused by some of the comments on this board. Either the people who are posting their comments on this board lived in a different India than I did or are in complete denial. I came to the US as a 23 year old student 14 years ago. Prior to this I lived in India, where several of my friends at a major Indian university were openly gay. Has anyone who has posted a message to this discussion from India ever travelled as a backpacker through North India? In the railway stations, if you are there late enough, you see men openly having sex with each other. Or you can drive the national highways that traverse the country, pull into a dhaba and see a truck driver and his "helper" sleeping in the same khattiya.

I am heterosexual and my American spouse was rather amused that we could not hold hands in public in Delhi without being jeered at, when earlier that morning we had seen two men openly having sex on the platform in Agra railway station. A friend of mine is an epidemiologist in India, and she pointed out to me that the average Indian is such extreme denial about homosexuality, that it is almost impossible to start an AIDS education program that will have any impact on the large Indian gay community, many of whom are illiterate, unless Indians acknowledge that their gay fellow citizens exist. Hats off to groups like the Mercury Phoenix Foundation for paving the way to tolerance for all Indians, regardless of lifestyle.
Jog, USA


I'm gay. It took me 35 years to accept myself. But now I feel comfortable sharing it with most of my family, and they have accepted me with open arms.

V, India/USA
Some comments of readers here are portraying Homosexuality as a devient "choice". Please understand that it is NOT a choice. Knowing that it entails such heartache, no one would choose to be gay. I am one of three brothers who grew up in Punjabi middle class Delhi. All of them are comfortable, married heterosexuals. I'm gay, dating an American lawyer. It took me 35 years to accept myself. But now I feel comfortable sharing it with most of my family, and they have accepted me with open arms. It is time that we understand that human relationships are defined by deeper factors like soul, not sexuality. Whether heterosexual or homosexual, sexual roles defining relationships is what is unnatural to me. And that cuts across cultural or geographical lines. My Indian Punjabi middle class family is more supportive and accepting of me than a lot of my American friend's families are of them. It is a matter of soul, people. In fact, this issue has been debated in north Indian culture as "Roohani Satsang"- meeting of the souls irrespective of pre-defined roles, sexual or otherwise.
V, India/USA

Even though I have lived in the western world for the majority of my life and seen the church and many other organisations bend to the homosexual agenda and will, I really doubt if homosexuality will be allowed let alone be condoned anywhere in any Muslim country around the world.
Mohammed Arif, England

OF COURSE people in South Asia need to be more tolerant toward GLBTs (gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transsexuals). Attitudes toward sex in South Asia are ignorant and parochial. GLBTs are to be found everywhere. I personally know several gays and lesbians in India, and am proud to call some of them my friends. I get extremely suspicious when anyone starts explaining what is "natural" and what is not, or starts extolling the "virtues" (whatever they may be) of Hindu or Muslim culture. If you are a Hindu, have you ever heard of the Kamasutra? Come on, people, let's live and let live. We need to move beyond tolerance, to acceptance of such people as our equals. I wish GLBTs in South Asia all the best. Given the widespread prevalence of bigots among heterosexuals, GLBTs need all the luck they can get.
Iqbal Ahmed, India/USA

Homosexuality is not acceptable in South Asian countries like India, Pakistan or Bangladesh.
A Rafi, USA


Although I believe that homosexuality is an unacceptable lifestyle, I do think that South Asia needs to come to terms with its existence

Saeed, USA
Although I believe that homosexuality is an unacceptable lifestyle, I do think that South Asia needs to come to terms with its existence. Denial is not a constructive, nor viable, option. Violence against homosexuals should not be permitted, but neither should gross flaunting of one's sexuality. Discretion and modesty should be emphasised in the pursuit of understanding.
Saeed, USA

Being a Pakistani Muslim the issue of homosexuality is clear-cut, it cannot and must not be allowed. Homosexuality is banned in Islam and is clearly a disgusting and unnatural activity. I cannot speak for south Asia as a whole, but Pakistan is Islamic and never will allow homosexuality to exist openly, thankfully. The entire foundation for homosexuality is based on rebelliousness, people who want divert from the mainstream, it has no absolute biological basis.
Aftab Khan, USA


Homosexuals should not be discriminated against, but they should also accept reasonable sociological limitations

Guru Shenoy, USA
Homosexuality is a preference and I don't think there is anything wrong with it. However, it is one's own private matter - there is no need to parade the fact. Heterosexuality or being straight is of course how nature intended it, but deviation from that reality should not be considered abnormal. Homosexuals should not be discriminated against, but they should also accept reasonable sociological limitations. Gays are not outcasts, they are just a minority and as in most democratic institutions, they will face discrimination in certain avenues - that cannot be helped. It is not because they are gay, but because they are different from the majority.
Guru Shenoy, USA

Being a homosexual is not a crime; the act, if proved, is punishable. In fact, Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code makes all "unnatural acts" (whether by heterosexuals or homosexuals) a crime. That's the position in India and I assume it's also the case in other former colonies of the British Raj in South Asia as this antiquated law is a legacy of the British. This law is being blatantly used to harass and blackmail gay men and women, and it's time it was struck off and other measures introduced to give les-bi-gay people equal rights.
Nitin Karani, India


A relationship between two consenting adults is their business

SM, Boston
I lived in India for 18 years and I don't think the West made me gay. I definitely don't think homosexuality defies "nature and the natural habitat." For me loving men came as naturally as loving a woman comes to a heterosexual teenager. I suppose you think that being physically handicapped is also "against nature and the natural habitat" since we were supposed to be able to walk on our two feet. Respect us for who we are, I don't ask you what you do in your bedrooms. Don't ask me what I do in mine. A relationship between two consenting adults is their business. Why don't we direct our wrath towards child prostitution or bonded labour?
SM, Boston

Islam does not allow homosexuality and I believe it should not be allowed in India, Sri Lanka and especially in any Islamic country.
Omer Kamal, USA

We in Pakistan tolerate homosexuality. Because of the strict moral dilemma of the separation of sexes in social life, homosexuality is pervasive all over the country. You see transvestites openly plying their trade on the street corners of major cities without any let or hindrance. However, we are shy and uncomfortable with public displays of affection. So, nobody can show any signs of affection. Actually, I think Pakistan is one of the few countries in the world where homosexuals can openly hug and lay in a park in each other's arms but no heterosexual couple can even think of it.
Babur Irfani, Pakistan

There is nothing mentioned in either Buddhist or Hindu texts about homosexuality. Learning to live and let live is usually one of the South Asian hallmarks even though we seem to forget it sometimes. We should be accepting of all people and stop instinctively trying to marginalise people based on differences.
Shiran Vyasa, Sri Lankan in Canada


In these Southeast Asian societies the closet is the safer option

Henbane, UK

The problem is that in these very closed societies anything concerning sex is considered "dirty". Frankly, there is a massive amount of hypocrisy here. We all know what happens when you have an unnatural segregation of the sexes (as you do in these nations) so I very much doubt if they are free of homosexuality or other ills such as child abuse, etc. I believe people have little choice in their orientation and those who are this way should not be persecuted. However, nor should they flaunt it in public - all societies find such displays distasteful and offensive. In these Southeast Asian societies the closet is the safer option.
Henbane, UK

I think you'll find that Muslims by and large will NEVER accept homosexuals as equals - something that the Christian Church is compromising every day. Jesus certainly didn't say anything about making homosexuals equal.
Zafar, England

I'm hopeful my sexuality will be fully accepted in my home country of India such as it is in the United States. My Indian friends here have been very supportive of my partner and me. I would like to see that cultured attitude of accepting gays more prevalent in India, where so many of my close relations follow the same lifestyle.
Bajel Thack, India


I never even knew till now that there were gay men in the Indian subcontinent

Anupa , Indian/ USA
I never even knew till now that there were gay men in the Indian subcontinent. Indian and Pakistani men as so chauvinistic the thought never even crossed my mind. I knew certain regions of India had men cross dressing, but homosexuals Not that I against it. Many of my friends in the US are gay. I wish all gay people in the Indian subcontinent the best, towards acceptance, tolerance and openness from their fellow men and women around them, but it going to be an up hill battle.
Anupa , Indian/ USA

This is in response to Mr Morgan Connors comments that homosexuality should be tolerated in south Asia because of their population problems. Does he similarly imply in less populated portions of the world say Canada etc, people should have 4 or 5 wives to fix their problem? Homosexuality is not something that people of south Asia will accept and that it is the way it should be. This is not being intolerant but just putting sex in the proper perspective, i.e. sex is not everything in life.
Prasanna Parthasarathi, India

The question is not that simple. In fact, it is even premature. Many educated middle class South Asians are not not even aware that there are gays in their country. If they are blind to the existence of a portion of their population, how can they even think in terms of granting equal rights? After all, it is easier discriminating against an invisible minority.
Thaths, US

I too, am an American of Sri Lanka descent and realise that the traditional views supersede human rights, in countries such as Sri Lanka. Yet, I think if change is going to occur, it must begin with pride. Gay men and women should not have to suppress their sexuality because "...others will see they are just human beings and will treat them as such". We are all human beings, and if heterosexuals can flaunt their sexuality, why can't the Gay community? Change begins with one's heart and mind, obviously even American's of Sri- Lankan heritage - as noted in the comments above - are still close-minded and close hearted. That is pretty tragic.
Hashanthi Perera, USA


If we can follow our beliefs without infringing on others' freedoms, without forcing others to agree the world might just be a better place

SM, Boston
South Asia is a region of great contradictions - on one hand it supports a tremendous variety of ethnic groups, cultures and religions and on the other it is often plagued by communal riots, intolerance, and bigotry.
As hard as it is to change, I can only hope that people in South Asia and around the world learn to respect others' preferences and views, although they may not always correspond with theirs. If we can follow our beliefs without infringing on others' freedoms, without forcing others to agree the world might just be a better place.
SM, Boston

Yes it is true that the west is more open to sexual diversity. However many of us are of the opinion that this is a bad thing. Many of us think it is high time that the relatively conservative mores of the East need to be taken as the norm. What many people see as an alternative lifestyle, most Eastern people see as debauchery. Most of us don't need it, don't want it. Keep your lifestyle to yourself.
Zafar, Pakistan/USA

Being a Muslim and a follower of Islam, I would only say that homosexuality is not at all acceptable by any follower of Islam. It is strictly prohibited in Islam and countries like Pakistan, Iran and Bangladesh should never allow this thing to happen.
Ibrahim Hamid, Canada

In every given population of humans, there are a small percentage of homosexuals. At least that's what the westerners say. I don't know about Sri Lanka and India but in Pakistan which is an Islamic country, homosexuals should remain in the closet. They shouldn't show their emotions towards the same sex in public. But then that's ok since heterosexuals can't show their emotions in public either in Pakistan.
Syed Zia, USA


Although our society is traditional, it has been a tolerant society

Navarun Gupta, USA
As a south Asian gay man from India, I have seen the gay movement blossom in many Indian cities and in the south Asian diaspora across the world (especially USA). I am optimistic about the outlook for gays and lesbians in India. Although our society is traditional, it has been a tolerant society. There is more diversity in India than anywhere else in the world and people have learned to live and let live. Homosexuality is just another fibre in this fabric of diversity which will become visible and accepted in India sooner than we think.
Navarun Gupta, USA

The question is do we want to promote these relationships which defies nature and natural habitat. This vice should be cured by tolerance, and not by violence. However, the bottom line being people should realise this is an unhealthy relationship, and will only but defy the human lifecycle. So ask yourself do you want to go against the very cause of your creation?
Chanchal Chakraborty, India

Its nothing to do with us ! Having suffered over the last 10 years from the media ramming a minority issue down our throats constantly. Please lets leave the purer cultures of the sub-continent to there own devices. If they want to accept it - FINE, if they don't¿ that's their cultural choice... I think its us that should be more tolerant of their culture - not the other way round.
Francis Anderson, UK

Its high time India woke up to these issues staring us in the face. On a larger context, equality for all is the only way to go. And if India finds this difficult, because of its highly segregated past, then there's no slow and steady cure for it. Unless you get a rude awakening, you really don't do what can be done tomorrow, today. These are your sons and daughters. Your friends, your bosses, brothers and sisters. Get together everyone, and stand up for the individual's right to exist as they choose to.
Jay, US


We are losing our cultural and moral values at an alarming rate and the western civilisation is partly to be blamed for this

Sanjay Gupta, India
With the advancement of science and technology, we have ushered in the information technology age. But alas, we are losing our cultural and moral values at an alarming rate and the western civilisation is partly to be blamed for this. Instead of promoting the natural love and bond between a man and a woman in martial harmony, it over-emphasises on the sexual freedom and encourages the youth to experiment with all kinds of life styles - sex in early teens, homosexuals, punks, hippies and what not.
Sanjay Gupta, India

Indians in India are becoming more tolerant towards homosexuality and I believe the day is not far when the laws are changed. There is no need to flaunt ones sexuality, however. Awareness is essential. And this awareness will come as the nation matures and progresses ahead.
Vijay N, USA

No it isn't time. South Asia is a place where drinking alcohol is still considered a taboo. There are millions of people in South Asia who still need to be educated academically. Once that happens, then the government can worry about demonstrating tolerance towards homosexuals.
Nitish Dass, USA


We have thousands of other more pressing issues to catapult the country into a vibrant economic power where all its people can live above the poverty line

Anil TLN, India
I can't talk about whole of south Asia. In India, homosexuality is illegal. As a law abiding citizens, I think it is the responsibility to follow the law of the land. Like every Indian, I believe in democracy and we have a pretty vibrant one. If the people feel (majority as is obvious to any democracy) this law needs to be changed, then it will be. We have thousands of other more pressing issues to catapult the country into a vibrant economic power where all its people can live above the poverty line before we as majority peoples can consider changes to these laws. How about abolishing passports and making every human a true citizen of the world?
Anil TLN, India

It's very important to start the debate over homosexuality in South Asia because most of it's people believe this doesn't exist. And its also time to people from South Asia should be more open and tolerant over lifestyles which are not common in these countries.
Anton Suresh, Sri Lanka

I'm not sure about Bangladesh, India, or Sri Lanka, but Pakistan is an Islamic Republic, and in Islam there is no tolerance for homosexuality. So therefore no, I do not believe that homosexuality should be tolerated or made legal in Pakistan.
Fozia S-Ali, US


'Celebration of diversity' might be a clichéd term in the west, but the concept still has a long way to go in South Asia

Mohammad Khan, Pakistan
Being a gay Pakistani myself, I realise the social pressures that stare desi gays in the face day in and day out. However, sexual minorities like myself are not the only victims of intolerance in that part of the world, all other sorts of minorities share the same grief, be they ethnic, linguistic, religious, or sexual in nature.
Tolerance of diverse, off-the-mainstream ideas and beliefs is what our region terribly lacks in. 'Celebration of diversity' might be a clichéd term in the west, but the concept still has a long way to go in South Asia.
Mohammad Khan, Pakistan

It's time for South Asia to catch up with the "acceptance" movement taking place around the world. Human Rights were designed for every and all persuasions.
As a global rhythm resounds, South Asians need to open their hearts, eyes and souls to include and promote love and kindness for all people. We only have each other to rely on, peace begins with acceptance.
Cate Stewart, Canada


I feel that homosexuals should keep their sexuality to themselves (i.e. not flaunt it) so that others will see they are just human beings

Natasha, US
I'm an American of Sri Lankan heritage and I think that South Asia which is an area so steeped in tradition will find it difficult to tolerate homosexuals in the open. Tradition is such that, as in the Middle East, it will take years to break. Honestly, I hope that tolerance will become the norm but I feel that homosexuals should keep their sexuality to themselves (i.e. not flaunt it) so that others will see they are just human beings and will treat them as such rather than judging them by sexuality.
Natasha, US

Yes, they should be more tolerant. Who does it hurt if someone prefers to be romantically involved with a person of their own gender? Anyway, with the population problem of South Asia, homosexuality should be more than tolerated.
Morgan O'Conner, USA


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