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Tuesday, 25 July, 2000, 15:08 GMT 16:08 UK
Can we spend our way out of gridlock?
The UK government wants to spend a massive 180 billion over the next ten years to improve the country's transport infrastructure. The package will include:
  • Money for road maintenance, motorway widenings and new bypasses.
  • 40 billion to improve railway infrastructure.
  • Investment in other forms of public transport, to entice drivers out of their cars.
It sounds like a lot of money for a lot of projects, but will it be enough? Will it be spent properly? Are the priorities right?

This debate is now closed. Read a selection of your comments below.


Your reaction

Laugh all you like but a solution to this could be to install computers that take over full control of the car whilst driving on the motorway. It's been happening in the air for years, why not do it on the road?
A computer does not panic and act irrationally and would easily be able to communicate its intentions to overtake, reduce speed ect to all the other computer driven cars... If we're talking about the future, why not be radical.
Mike Reid, Birmingham, UK

Bring in a law which says that every single MP, and their families, must use public transport, and only public transport, for a period of one month

Lindsay Ponting, UK
There is one good way to improve public transport - bring in a law which says that every single MP, and their families, must use public transport, and only public transport, for a period of one month (the only exception being in case of, for example, medical emergency). At the end of the one month, tell them that if public transport does not improve in the next 12 months the whole exercise would be repeated annually until it does improve. There would be a massive improvement in public transport in no time. At the moment, believe me, travelling by public transport is very hard work!
Lindsay Ponting, UK

The car is not solely responsible for the pollution in our cities and large towns. Busses create over 100 times the pollutants of a normal car, that goes up to 3-400 times if you compare them to a motorbike.
The bus is the worst polluter on our roads yet it is seen as some sort of instant answer to all our problems.
What about trams and trolleybuses? But of course past governments scrapped them in favour of busses. This new 'initiative' is just normal government hot-air, spin and lies.
Ian Thomas, England

The pressure to reduce road usage by cars and lorries must be kept up, as so much of the roads lobby is moaning the policy must be working! However money must be pumped into public transport and encouraging cycling and walking
Vince Summers, Scotland

Has anyone noticed how easy it is to get to work when kids are on holiday?

Nick, England
Has anyone noticed how easy it is to get to work when kids are on holiday? STOP the school run and use some of the money to lay on school buses. This would be cheap and have an immediate effect
Nick, England

Some imagination is needed in how this money is spent, but probably more is needed. We need to think 20 or 50 years ahead. We have more or less the same infrastructure as we had 50 years ago (only more of it). We need to think seriously about how we move the increased traffic around efficiently.
Relatively small incremental improvements won't do it. Lack of imagination has seen a huge increase in traffic lights and roundabouts for little overall gain, and very little improvement in public transport. The more smoothly we can move traffic and people around, the less pollution we'll generate and the more freedom we'll have. Let's innovate!
Tony Weddle, UK

More money alone is probably not the solution. As the transport network has become ever more fragmented due to privatisation an integrated transport policy is no longer possible. The money announced by Prescott is surely just a sop and subsidy to these private companies.
It would seem logical that the way to improve public transport is to ensure it is integrated. Perhaps the money would have been better spent re-centralising the rail network and ensuring safety issues do not take second place to profits and shareholder interests.
Dave P, UK

What public transport? It is mostly in private hands now!

A. Faulkner, Switzerland (UK citizen)
What public transport? It is mostly in private hands now! Here in Switzerland, the public transport is so good that I almost never use my car. However, even if the UK had a transport system better than the Swiss one, I would never use it at night. The reason - a car is much safer from crime. Tackle both transport AND crime, and you might get somewhere.
A. Faulkner, Switzerland (UK citizen)

There's one small point that those arguing for no more money for roads seem to have missed - what do buses travel on? Why, roads of course. So do coaches - often on our motorways. Unless the infrastructure is in place to allow rapid and efficient journeys for these vehicles, we'll stay exactly where we are now.
Andrew Rose, England

I think we are panicking for no real reason. Necessity is the mother of invention and the only reason that we are gridlocked at the moment is that we are still working in a Victorian, factory-based 9 to 5 world. As the knowledge economy grows, more and more people will be able to work at home rather than travel to an office. I believe that humans will become more solitary and will not need or want to travel by the end of this next century.
Mike, UK

If you wish to relieve city centre congestion then implement incremental road tax rates in proportion to car engine sizes and have city centre lanes dedicated for buses and cars with 2 or more passengers only.
Tim Langford, UK

Motorcycles cover more miles each year than bicycles and are the fastest growing form of flexible private transport - so why no mention in the Government's 10 year plan? Come on Tony - stick to your manifesto to beat congestion and pollution!
Roland, UK

I also think that funding for more roads is misplaced. However, since there will always be cars on the road efforts should be made to reduce pollution and noise.
Matt Shreeve, UK

The anti road brigade go on about congestion on the road. But they need to travel on the tube or a commuter train into London to know the true meaning of congestion. The tube for example is carrying 5 times the number of passengers it was designed for and my commuter line has seen the number of passengers double over the last few years.
Alan Tyne, UK

Those who suggest that building bypasses and opening new roads is pointless should realise that before improvement of the A303 and the opening of the M3 gridlock happened in most villages and small towns on the route from London to the West Country during every summer weekend: a problem which no longer occurs.
John Brownlee, England

I support this long overdue ten year commitment to public transport but some of the expansion of road capacity needs to be more selective. More emphasis is needed on traffic calming and giving more road space to pedestrians.
Dr Morris Bradley, UK

Having lived in Britain for two years, and having been a frequent rider of British Rail back in the '80s, I think that the government should put even more money into the railways. Britain has an excellent rail system, particularly in the Inter-City sector, but it is an old system, so a heavy overhaul of the infrastructure, to allow for 200+ mph train service is required.
Jeff, USA

I am sure that this will be unpopular but I think expensive petrol and cheap buses will deliver less congestion. Those people who want to clog up the roads by car commuting have to face the responsibility for wanting it both ways, a nice home in the country and a well paid job in the city.
J Watkin, UK

Aren't trains, rail infrastructure and buses all privately owned now? Public money for private enterprises... remind me again which party is in power?
Paul R, UK

Spend it all on public transport and it might succeed, build another lane of motorway and it will only increase the gridlock.
Gerry , Scotland

If all MPs and especially government ministers were made to abandon their privileged modes of transport and use only public transport boy would we see some rapid improvements in the services on offer. All the while people like John Prescott only go near a public service vehicle for a photo opportunity the words will be there but very little personal commitment to making any significant improvements.
J Gregory, UK

If all the old polluting cars over ten years old were banned from cities the two problems of pollution and congestion would be solved instantly

Jim, UK
40% of cars on British roads are over nine years old and are stinking bangers without catalysts. If all the old polluting cars over ten years old were banned from cities the two problems of pollution and congestion would be solved instantly with the expenditure of very little government money. Private companies would finance the improvements in public transport. Road safety would also be improved because old cars are usually ill-maintained and driven by inexperienced drivers.
Jim, UK

There are three types of public transport: Local, National, International. I'd be interested in seeing if the government will differentiate between these and instigate different initiatives on each. I use the word initiative with some hesitance!
Dan Rumney, England

Gary's idea of building high-speed rail links to run alongside motorways is nonsense. On the whole, motorways work well, other than near conurbation's where too much local traffic is attracted to them because of the appallingly poor local road structure. If we reduce the number of motorway junctions near conurbation's and ensure that traffic can flow through the main routes in the suburbs, instead of being channelled through our high streets, the whole system would work far more efficiently.
Brian, UK

If you accept the claim that "more roads means more cars", then you should also accept the argument that "more hospitals means more sick people" or "more schools means more children". I commend the government's wise decision to give us drivers back a small proportion of the 36 billion pounds we pay a year in fuel taxes, I just wish they'd given us more.
Pete Morgan-Lucas, Wiltshire, UK

The train and bus companies will only work if re-nationalised and made free to use that would certainly get me out of my car

Steve, Scotland
We have been waiting some 40 years for a bypass around Aberdeen. I welcome the news that more of the taxes bled from me will be used on the roads. I don't use trains, trams or buses and I for one object to subsidising the dividends and share prices of private companies. The train and bus companies will only work if re-nationalised and made free to use that would certainly get me out of my car.
Steve, Scotland

Suddenly, John Prescott is pro-car again. He has learnt that being anti private car, will lose votes. The money for public transport is good for the elderly and rural buses, etc, but the new road programme will be yet another waste of money at the expense of the environment. Remember the Newbury bypass fiasco. Cars will simply fill very quickly new road capacity as it is made available. Sadly, New Labour is just the same as all previous governments, political expedience rules!
Paul Wheeler, England

I am working class. That means that I have to get up and go to work to pay my bills as do approximately 98% of the country. (Pensioners and children excluded.) One of the pleasures in my life is driving a car on uncongested roads. So why do some people still insist on increasing the cost of one of my pleasures? You obviously attack problems from the wrong end. If public transport was reliable, people would not have to be persuaded to use it. And it's good to have a choice.
Andrew Morton, England/Australia

Matt Law is talking rubbish. I live in the country and would dearly love to have the option of using public transport. When I go to visit friends for a drink, I can't actually drink as I need to drive home. I would love to be able to leave my car at home, have a few beers and still get home in the evening without having to drive at all. If the transport were available and reliable I for one would use it.
Nigel Lansgrove, UK

To entice drivers away from their motorway traffic jams, why not build high-speed rail links to run alongside

Gary, England
To entice drivers away from their motorway traffic jams, why not build high-speed rail links to run alongside, and be very visible from, motorways, and build stations near many of the motorway junctions, particularly where motorways intersect. If all goes well, drivers will see how they are being left behind and perhaps choose the more environment-friendly public transport.
Gary, England

I live in a semi-rural area with a very good bus service into the main town centre - low cost, reliable, frequent. And yet the majority of my work colleagues who hark from the same place choose to use their cars. However, in the light of recent fuel price increases, a select few are considering making the change. It's unfortunate, but a change in attitudes will take more than 10 years to instigate. In the meantime, tax fuel to discourage unnecessary car journeys and spend the revenue on raising public transport so that we can all enjoy a viable alternative. And more spending on the cycle networks please!
Tracy, UK

Matt Law must be living on the moon. If rail services were reliable and subsidised then of course I would use them. I drive 40,000 miles a year. I would much rather let the train take the strain but it is too expensive and unreliable. I know because I checked. My car costs 10 less a week than it costs to get the train. Lower the prices or make season tickets available for all journeys and then I will not need my car.
Philip Levy, UK

I applaud the spending on public transport, however the contention that improving roads just brings more traffic is foolish, followed to its logical conclusion the result of paving the entire country would be that it all filled with traffic... so where are you going to find all these people to drive all these cars? Robots perhaps.
Chris Hann, USA (British)

If the money was spent on better public transport then yes, we would get out of the gridlock. I used to live in a village where there was only one bus a week (out of the village) and non returning. The nearest regular bus stop was 3 miles away. We have moved to another rural area (house prices exclude urban living from us). It would cost myself and my partner 120 a month on bus fares to commute the (short) journey to work, when the petrol costs are only 20. Make rural to urban bus fares cheaper please, and give buses to those who don't have them.
Ruth, UK

Politicians must realise that they need to actively discourage people from using their cars

Andy Spencer, England
Politicians must realise that they need to actively discourage people from using their cars. We have become car dependent. Examples like charging people to take cars into major town and city centres, higher car tax, bigger penalties for company car users etc. We also need to see Labour setting the example, not taking two cars 100 yards to their conference!
Andy Spencer, England

It is good that they are spending money on both public transport and roads. I have a car myself but I like to have the choice of using public transport as well. I live in a village, and am confined to using my car but if I was living in a town with good public transport then I would mix my use of the car and public transport depending on the purpose of my journey. If I'm travelling long distance, then I like to take the train if viable as it is a more comfortable and more relaxing journey. Hopefully with this investment package, other people might mix their use of private/public transport, like they do in Europe.
Michael Pala, UK

The sizeable sum of money for public transport is very good news. The almost-as-big sum for building more roads is not. When will politicians realise that car usage simply expands to fill the available road space? Yet more British countryside sacrificed for politicians' careers.
Gary Hellen, Briton temporarily in Cyprus

We can spend our way out of this transport mess but it needs to be very wise spending

Steve, England
We can spend our way out of this transport mess but it needs to be very wise spending. It has to address the fact that most people who work commute. This means more roads and more importantly a varied public transport network. Rail needs to be concentrated on, which hew lines opening. Personally I don't think the government will be that brave and most of the cash will be wasted.
Steve, England

Question - If the Government is serious about supporting Public Transport why on earth did it "invest" Millions in Rover cars instead of letting it go to the wall? I think one of the recent BT campaigns had it right, work from home rather than commute. Just imagine the effect not commuting in on one day a week would have, be it by bus, road or rail. Any new/additional infrastructure uses resources.
Richard Wheeler, UK

Most people (excluding those who travel in to London) do not want to give up their car, do not want to use public transport... No amount of money spent on public transport will get us out of our cars... the ONLY way to get us out of our cars and on to the busses is by making car ownership costly...
Matt Law, UK

Please spend the money on public transport. Car drivers moan about tax on petrol but fail to realise how much their selfish driving costs the rest of us. (Asthma, traffic accidents, air pollution, noise pollution, I could go on but that would make me a whinging green, right?)
Catherine, UK

Money ploughed into digital infrastructure would make tele-working a much more viable option than it is presently

S Pilchard, UK
A more sustainable approach would focus more on ways to reduce the need to travel. Money ploughed into digital infrastructure would make tele-working a much more viable option than it is presently. I also would have liked to see money used to create incentives for bicycle use. Bikes are healthy, safe and sustainable. Furthermore, in the long term, their increased usage would reduce NHS bills for heart disease.
S Pilchard, UK

As this government's sole purpose is to collect ever more taxes this is an ideal ploy. More and bigger roads equates to more vehicles which equates to more taxes for the Labour coffers. And if anyone believes that this administration, no matter how much money they throw at it, will deliver better trains and buses must have very short memories.
Bill Tull, UK

Whatever happened to the telecommuting revolution?
Andrew Day, UK

I love cars and see them as the ultimate in freedom of movement. However, I am also extremely concerned about the environment. Happily, low emission vehicles are already a reality. Unfortunately, the government has chosen not even to recognise this in their transport plan, which I can characterise in one word: Pathetic.
Phil Saum, UK

I am alarmed to see more money being spent on roads rather than on public transport. I live in London, which is virtually at a deadlock on the roads and yet it is still more attractive to people to use their cars because the tubes, trains and buses are so unreliable, smelly, uncomfortable and expensive.
Kathy, UK

100 more bypasses? 130 more "full scale local road improvements" and 360 miles of widened motorways. Is it only me that remembers the Labour promise that "there will be no more Twyford Down's under Labour"?
Martyn, UK

I'd like to hear expert opinion on the concept of re-testing drivers every decade or so. I realise this may require huge resources, but essentially if it were correctly balanced you would limit the number of drivers on the road; and also improve road safety - only drivers who pass their tests would be allowed on our roads.
Chris Williams, England

Half the reason many journeys are by car is that Public Transport is so lousy in every sense

Peter, UK
I believe Ben Elton quite clearly put this once on one of his shows with a rubbish bin i.e. the bigger the bin the more rubbish you put in it. In other words the more roads more cars. The investment needs to go on public transport, better bus and rail services. Integrated transport schemes. Half the reason many journeys are by car is that Public Transport is so lousy in every sense i.e. messy, expensive and unreliable. Surely focusing investment on Public transport will decrease the need of large investment in roads and help the environment to boot. Oh well welcome back to the real world!
Peter, UK

More money = more roads = more cars = gridlock. Answer? Public transport.
WGS, UK

There needs to be the right mix of attraction measures for public transport, and discouragement to drivers in urban areas. To this end I would have welcomed a more positive statement, as opposed to vague promises, on the introduction of more tram systems. Alongside these, city centre congestion charging measures need to have more firm backing from the government.
Steve Riley, UK

I am delighted that more money is to be spent on public transport, although I am worried that it will not be enough. However, I do not believe that improvements alone, welcome though they are, will entice the vast majority of car users onto public transport. So many people are addicted to their cars: including my brother, who despite living in Sydney with its excellent public transport, refuses to use it, preferring to sit in a jam in comfort instead.
James, UK

People in the UK have the sense that by driving in your car you control your travel much more than by using public transport

Chris, UK
People in the UK have the sense that by driving in your car you control your travel much more than by using public transport. You decide when you set off, which route you take, how much baggage you can carry, how fast you travel, etc. Until public transport offers a service approaching this sort of control and flexibility for the traveller people will continue to pay through the nose for their use of a car, and accept the longer travel times.
Chris, UK

When discussing solutions to transport problems, why does no one mention scooters and motorcycles? One person riding a scooter takes up much less road space than one person in a car, and uses far less fuel!
Doug Futers, England

Further investment in roads is surely only a short-sighted attitude. Perhaps if it wasn't for the Beeching cuts then more Rail travel would still be possible to areas which have no alternative but roads. Getting goods onto the railways instead of HGVs clogging up the roads would make a huge difference.
Terry, Scotland

Instead of wasting all that money on new roads the government should buy new cars for everyone. People would drive politely and more carefully so as to protect their new cars, thus increasing safety and reducing gridlock.
Neil Hastings, USA

Hats off to the government for at least doing something positive about the infrastructure

Alison, UK
The short answer to the question is no. But hats off to the government for at least doing something positive about the infrastructure which is in stark contrast to the deliberate under funding of the past Tory administrations.
If the money is spent wisely and not just poured into the coffers of privatised railway companies to spend on dividends and pay rises, real improvement should be possible.
Alison, UK

130bn over the next ten years. That sounds a lot but, allowing for inflation, it's only a fifth of what the government will raise from taxing the motorist. If all of the money was spent on road improvements the motorist would still be being ripped off. But then it is this Government which is always going on about rip-off Britian. There is a naive view; proliferated by the green brigade, that reducing traffic to a crawl is a good thing. The fashion for negative camber, traffic calming, compulsory give ways and traffic lights on roundabouts means cars have to come to an unnecessary stop. Build bigger roads with fly-overs, underpasses and slip roads instead of junctions and you've a much more time efficient and system which also reduces fuel consumption.
Simon Rockman, UK

It is about time that the Government woke up, smelt the coffee and did something

Alex Banks, Wales
It is about time that the Government woke up, smelt the coffee and did something. It's great that this is being treated as a serious issue, and not before time. Our public transport system has been underfunded since the Second World War. However, I'm still dubious on two counts; I think it will take 25 years to make a difference - I don't think that a significant overall improvement will be had in 10, and secondly I don't have faith in a Conservative government carrying on this policy.
Alex Banks, Wales

To work, public transport has to be effective, fast, frequent, clean, safe and affordable - for all. If Mr Jags can meet all of these criteria with his various projects then why not? Road widening schemes are a depressing reflection of how this country is turning into a huge park.
Thomas Holloran, UK

Let's hope this increased spending will be directed at local street level initiatives - Home Zones for example, where traffic is reduced to a walking pace through re-designed residential streets. This will make our urban environment a safe and pleasant place to walk and cycle. My fear is that Prescott will go for the headline chasing big schemes and ignore local communities seeking to reclaim our streets from cars.
Nick Long, UK

It is a lot of money and about time too! After years of under-investment by the Tories, this Government has got the priorities right and after three years of prudent financial management, has the money to realise those priorities and invest over the long-term.
Riad, UK

Well we certainly have a long way to go. Train tickets are so expensive that a friend of mine chose to buy an old car to travel from Scotland to Kent and then sold it for a little less. The difference plus the fuel was amazingly less than the ticket for him and his wife! And he actually got to where he was going on time!
Judith, England

The lack of good transportation systems in this country is gradually choking it to death, unfortunately the chances of this money being spent wisely are very slim. I believe that a large percentage of it will just be swallowed up by bureaucratic Whitehall departments.
Dave, United Kingdom

We will, eventually, be forced to organise ourselves in a more local fashion

Robert Jones, England
The unpalatable truth about transport is that it's just too easy! We have all come expect transport over really quite huge distances to be easy, convenient and affordable.
It may as well be said plainly that this is simply not sustainable in the long run, no matter how we organise our transport systems. As a society we will, eventually, be forced to organise ourselves in a more local fashion, so that much of our current travel is rendered unnecessary.
Robert Jones, England

What we need is regular, clean, affordable and safe public transport to all areas, or otherwise to acknowledge the fact that motoring for the majority is a necessity and focus on delivering near zero emission cars. When I see old buses belching out clouds of grey black smoke I do wonder which alternative is actually better: I for one, would prefer green cars.
Stu, UK

What rarely comes out in this debate is the vested interests of the development lobby

Roy, UK
What rarely comes out in this debate is the vested interests of the development lobby. By-passes are rarely just that but are also usually opportunities to access land for new housing or warehouse building. This, of course, creates even more traffic but does make a few people rich.
Roy, UK B Maguire, United Kingdom

If one is going to subsidise, it must be sustainable through the tough times; if one is going to invest, it must realise a return. Otherwise, we are simply creating yet another public spending burden on the already exhausted tax payer. These are the lessons we learned from previous Labour administrations, brutally (and rightly) made clear by the "corrective" Tory years. Therefore, using tolls and car taxes to specifically and clearly pay for improving roads and subsidising public transport is the way to go.
Mark M. Newdick, USA/UK

I am completely frustrated with the lip service given to resolving transport issues.

Simon C, UK
I have been commuting to work on cycle for 20 years. I am completely frustrated with the lip service given to resolving transport issues. The British people will never give up or even reduce the use of their precious cars. Motorists in my experience are becoming ever more insular at best and aggressive at worst, towards pedestrians, cyclists and each other. And now the government is going to build more roads. Well it should win them votes, but not mine.
Simon C, UK

It would seem that the government's transport plans include nothing for pedestrians, and the nightmare we tolerate in British cities with reckless drivers. How about a zero-tolerance policy on traffic violations, funded by the fines it would raise? As well as improving road safety, imposing severe penalties would quickly reduce the number of licensed drivers, forcing them into public transport (or even on foot!)
Daniel, London, UK

As usual the so-called intelligencia of this country are tackling this from the wrong angle. There are sufficient roads already; the crux of the problem is the principle that personal transport is a seen to be a right. If your skills are poor you should only be allowed to drive small capacity cars in a urban environment, increasing in measured steps to a performance licence which will include skid pan and high speed track work which will allow you to drive any vehicle on any road. Re-testing every 5 years, will also create jobs for instructors and testers, with more tests and lessons creating extra revenue. So many people on our roads do not realise how bad their driving actually is. How many people do you know that you have been in a car with and have actually been scared without being driven fast.
Alan Manson, Scotland

I've just returned from Amsterdam, perhaps we could take a leaf out of their book

Deborah Benbrook, England
I live about 7 miles out of Leeds and choose to drive into work - it's cheaper, quicker and more reliable than public transport. I've just returned from Amsterdam, perhaps we could take a leaf out of their book - double-decker trains, trams every few minutes, even more buses. Given the option, I would prefer to leave my car at home but at the moment I don't feel as though I have any other choice.
Deborah Benbrook, England

Mr Brown has unfairly hammered the motorist with his super-tax on petrol so it is only right that Prescott spends the ill-gotten gains on improving the roads.
Dr. S, UK

It is well understood now that road building and widening does nothing to reduce congestion - though politicians choose to ignore the research. More road space just encourages more people to work further away from home, bringing more cars on to the roads. The Government might just as well have set fire to the 130 billion, for all the good it will do. The only way to cut road congestion is to make public transport; particularly train travel, preferable to the car for the majority of people. That means making those services faster, more reliable, cheaper and less congested. Sadly, that requires much more money than the 40 billion allocated!
Paul, Wales

It's about time a decent amount of money was spent on the transport system. I just hope it's spent wisely - infrastructure is the key. However, I think the decision to delay motorway tolls is wrong. They offer an alternative (in generating revenue and in considering environmental impact) to the high prices currently seen in the fuel market. They also would not affect rural populations nearly as much. Finally, they would put road and rail back towards a level playing field. If a government can privatise the rail industry, why not privatise some of the roads, especially the motorways?
Angus Bryant, UK

It depends how the money is spent. If "Two Jags" is just going to widen roads to allow more cars to clog them up in ten years time, then it's money down the drain. I'd like to see some really imaginative solutions to the transport crisis, not just more trains and cars on jam-packed networks.
Jamie, London

The governments strategy should be based upon respecting motorists choices, rather than nannying them

David T, UK
The simple truth that the government seems reluctant to face up to is that road congestion is, for most motorists, self-regulating. What most motorists, who object to congestion, really mean is that they would like to use the road, but do not want to sit in a jam. If motorists don't want to sit in traffic jams, they don't take the journey or alternatively go by public transport. That motorists do use their cars is evidence that congestion is simply not enough of a problem for them. The governments strategy should be based upon respecting motorists choices, rather than nannying them.
David T, UK

Let us hope that the outcome of all this money is a situation where people want to use their cars less, not forced to use their cars less. A perceived increase in personal freedom is the obvious carrot to entice people off the roads.
Chris Cowdery, UK

I just can't bring myself to believe that this issue can be remedied with public cash alone

Richard N, London, UK
I just can't bring myself to believe that this issue can be remedied with public cash alone. Transport service bosses need to be more financially accountable for delayed services, dodgy safety and cattle-market carriages. This is one area where I'd like to see more red tape.
Richard N, London, UK

Based on vast travelling experience around the globe, I would recommend to create fast, convenient and cheap public transport means for private users and efficient rail and waterways for industrial users and rather stop investing completely on roads that are primarily used for get to work and fun driving. It is only the road inconvenience that will remove drivers from them and that only if attractive other transport means is available.
Mikko Toivonen, Finland

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20 Jul 00 | Politics
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