Page last updated at 09:38 GMT, Wednesday, 7 October 2009 10:38 UK

Your comments: BA staff

BA planes

Unions representing British Airways cabin crew are planning an emergency meeting after the airline said it would cut 1,700 jobs and freeze pay.

BBC News website readers have been giving their views on the problems facing the company.

COMMENTS FROM BA STAFF

e-mail sent in by reader

I am a BA cabin crew member on longhaul. This change is being imposed - our union has not agreed to this. Around 50% of my salary is made up of variable pay, i.e. money I receive depending on which trips I am rostered. It will mean the loss of a substantial part of my salary as the 'new' crew will be given the most lucrative routes. BA want to save approximately 28% from cabin crew costs and yet have accepted savings of between 0 and 5% from all other parts of the business.
Anon, Twickenham

e-mail sent in by reader

In a recent email to staff Willie Walsh said that the Heathrow based crew costs are way out of line with our competitors. So why hasn't he taken serious steps to reduce the cost of pilots? There are plenty of pilots out there who would work for BA at a fraction of the cost and on much reduced terms and conditions.
Name withheld by request, London

e-mail sent in by reader

I work as cabin crew at Gatwick and I think that it is about time that cabin crew based at Heathrow were brought into line with their fellow colleagues at Gatwick, who do the same job for significantly less money.
Joanna, London

e-mail sent in by reader

I remain proud to work as cabin crew for British Airways. It's not all negative as the voluntary redundancy, unpaid leave and part-time opportunities are proving favourable to some employees. Yes, there are cost cutting changes which are challenging, however it's ensuring our survival for the future. We have unfortunately seen other airlines fold and collapse through this recession. I'd personally rather work under these more difficult times now than not be able to say I work for BA in the future - that would be very sad.
Anon, Cheshire

e-mail sent in by reader

I don't see why a company trying to bring efficient working practices in could result in a strike? BA short-haul crew often only manage two flights in three days at work including two nights in a very nice hotel, and some are on ridiculous money with the CSD earning approximately £60k. BA aren't imposing pay cuts, just asking for an honest days work.
Nigel, Ascot

e-mail sent in by reader

Most people who work for BA understand the gravity of the situation facing not only BA, but the industry as a whole. My colleagues in management, engineering, and the pilots have all done their bit to help the airline cut costs - and now it's the turn of the cabin crew. Well done Willie Walsh for doing what needs to be done!
Anon, London

A British Airways Boeing 747

e-mail sent in by reader

Walsh wants to do to BA what he did to Aer Lingus but he will fail. The cabin crew will not stand idle as he attempts to turn us into a low cost, no frills airline.

Staff morale is at an all time low, and we as cabin crew would like to thank our customers for their support , and also apologise for the industrial action that Walsh will force us to take.
Stuart, London

e-mail sent in by reader

As a cabin crew member who has worked in Manchester and was then transferred to London when the Manchester base was closed down, I was shocked to see how 'easy' life was at Heathrow. To survive this crisis it is important that these measures are taken and the rest of my colleagues 'wake up and smell the coffee' and start to work for a living. Sorry my friends.
Identify supplied but withheld by request, Manchester

e-mail sent in by reader

I'm a BA crew member and these changes mean that all of us will have to work harder for less money and that will ultimately mean I will have to give up a job I love. However, the truth is that these changes have been planned for a long time and all the recent talks have simply been smoke and mirrors.
Anon, France

e-mail sent in by reader

I am recently retired staff having served for almost 40 years. Every department in BA bar one has been making saving for many years now. All of these departments are still proud to be able to deliver excellent service, whether to internal or external customers. For too long the LHR cabin crew have been under the illusion that they alone are the epitomy of good service. At last the Leadership Team has done what it is there to do, lead.
Raymond, West Malling UK

e-mail sent in by reader

I work as cabin crew for BA. On a flight I was shocked to learn that one colleague had volunteered to work for nothing, whilst another colleague on the same flight was working overtime and receiving an allowance of ten times the usual rate for a flying allowance! This incident was certainly not an incentive to encourage crew to work for nothing! It was, however, an example of the complete disarray in the company.
Anon, Dorking

e-mail sent in by reader

I am a BA employee in engineering. We have all made sacrifices for the sake of our ailing company. Most staff understand the predicament the company is in. Our pampered cabin crew fail to understand and continue to be blinkered. It is now time for them to accept change. I feel most staff are behind Willie Walsh and would not support cabin crew in the event of a strike. Let us hope it does not come to that!
John Beresford, Battle, UK

e-mail sent in by reader

I'm cabin crew for BA and I can't believe how harassed and bullied this management have been making us all feel. For the last year we've had nothing but different tactics being deployed to try and get us to accept these ghastly changes. I wanted to make a career out of flying, if the new fleet takes all my work where does that leave me? Sadly Mr Walsh has left me no option but to say yes to industrial action.
Anon, United Kingdom

e-mail sent in by reader

I think the move by BA is a very positive one. They are giving the staff choices, they can take voluntary redundancy or part time work. Those not wanting to leave, or work part time don't have to. They are not being forced to accept anything. It makes good business sense, and staff in other departments have responded positively.
Gordon , Newcastle



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