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Last Updated: Wednesday, 20 September 2006, 15:26 GMT 16:26 UK
Budapest riots: Hungarian views
A man waves his Hungarian flag outside the state-run Hungarian Television building in Budapest
The protests have continued in Budapest for two days
The Hungarian capital, Budapest, has seen two nights of rioting triggered by Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany's admission that he lied about the state of public finances to win re-election.

BBC News website readers in Hungary give their reaction to the violence and protests and discuss what they think should happen next.

ILONA KOVACS, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

It's a really scary situation here at the moment.

I am not talking about the violent protests, but the desperate political and economic situation we are facing under this government.

The prime minister lies to his people and admits it! It is a shocking and sad situation for us all to be in.

I have friends who are out protesting - I would be with them but I am seven months' pregnant. Even so I intend to get out and attend one of the mass rallies over the coming days. I feel that strongly about it.

Protestors hurl stones outside the state-run Hungarian Television in Budapest
Unfortunately there have been some violent protesters but, while I hate to see violence and fighting, they have their reasons to be there too

Why? Because I have one child and another on the way and I am so worried about the future of my family living under this government.

We have to take out huge loans to survive and our taxes keep going up. There is no sign of any improvement.

This is why the people of Hungary are angry.

The protesters are mostly peaceful. They believe in democracy and protest is the only way they know to attempt to force change.

Unfortunately there have been some violent protesters but, while I hate to see violence and fighting, they have their reasons to be there too. They are also angry with a government that is failing them.

The state-run media say they are troublemakers and hooligans but they are simply young people like us.

I hope the protests continue, peacefully. I don't see any solution to our situation other than a new election or the prime minister resigning.

Either way, it will be a very long and hard winter for the people of Hungary.

PETER LANGH, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

Peter Langh
I live very close to the area where the protests have been taking place.

I saw thousands of peaceful protesters outside the parliament and the state television station waving flags and placards.

I have also seen the aftermath of the violence, with burnt out cars outside both buildings.

It's a very difficult time here. The streets are all blocked off and it's hard to get around.

People are also very disillusioned with the political situation and are really anxious about what will happen next.

We're also in deep trouble economically.

Over the last couple of years the mood has definitely turned darker. People have been waiting for years to see any improvements and now this latest crisis has just made people even more frustrated.

It looks like we are in for a long power struggle
What the prime minister said was unbelievable. I was shocked when I heard it as were many people here.

So it's understandable these protesters have turned out to demonstrate against a government built on lies - the prime minister even admitted as much!

Unfortunately there is a minority who are just out to cause trouble. Fine, people are fed up, but that is not the way to achieve anything.

Protester holding flag in Budapest
Reader 'Ticyke' sent this picture of a protester in Budapest on Monday
It also just plays into the hands of the government, who are good at appearing that they can manage this type of unrest and are demonising the opposition for being behind it.

But the conservative opposition party Fidesz are not able to deal with this crisis anyway. Their support for it is counter-productive and it appears as if they have been outsmarted by the government. I personally didn't vote for either so cannot say who would be better or worse.

It looks like we are in for a long power struggle here between the two. The protests will probably continue and we will have to wait and see what happens. But, whatever the outcome, people will remain deeply unhappy until there is real change.

ZALAN ROZGONYI, SZEGED, HUNGARY

Zalan Rozgonyi
Most of these protesters simply don't know what Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany actually said in his speech.

Yes, he admitted that he and his government had been lying.

But he said much more than that.

If they had listened to the entire speech they would have heard him say that he is sick of the culture of lying that has existed in politics in this country for the past 10 years and wants to change it for the good of the people.

He held that closed meeting to confront his very own party with this fact and he said that it cannot go on.

I agree with him.

Reader Kathleen Caskie sent this picture of people running during the riots in Budapest
As the prime minister said the protests will continue until people get bored and go home
His government must be given a chance to introduce reforms for the good of all of us.

It will be painful but it will eventually benefit all Hungarians.

We pay very high taxes and they must be used effectively. We must give this government an opportunity to do this.

The rioters just needed an excuse to go on the streets and cause trouble. They are simply football hooligans and vandals.

I can understand that the peaceful demonstrators are out on the streets because they are not happy with the way things are in this country but I don't agree with their decision to protest.

If the demonstrations go on or if the government is overthrown it will just hurt Hungary.

As the prime minister said, the protests will continue until people get bored and go home.




VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS
Ilona Kovacs and Zsuzsanna Toth on Newshour



SEE ALSO
Hungarian PM defiant over riots
20 Sep 06 |  Europe



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