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Friday, 19 May, 2000, 16:35 GMT 17:35 UK
Great Cup final moments
Keith Houchen
Keith Houchen's diving header takes Coventry closer to Wembley glory in 1987
Saturday's game is the last-ever FA Cup final to be played at the old Wembley. When the Cup returns, the twin pepperpots will have been replaced by a 133m-high arch, a sliding roof put in place and the stadium moved 30 metres to the north.

Few will mourn the demise of the old stadium. It's been looking tatty for years. But before the bulldozers move in, we should pause to remember some of the great FA Cup finals of the past 77 years.

1923 - the first ever Wembley final
Organisers completely underestimated the number of Londoners who would turn up to see the new stadium. More than 120,000 fans passed through the turnstiles, undeterred by the sight of around 100,000 people rushing the barriers and climbing over the perimeter wall.

With nearly a quarter of a million people trying to cram into a stadium designed for less than half that number, it's little surprise thousands streamed onto the pitch. Only the sight of the King and the arrival of the famous white horse pushed the crowds back far enough for the game to start. Few remember that in the game itself, Bolton beat Second Division West Ham 2-0.

1953 - the Matthews Final
Having seen him finish on the losing side in both 1948 and 1951, the nation was desperate to see Stanley Matthews' Blackpool beat Bolton. But with the Trotters leading 3-1 midway through the second half, the future knight seemed fated to miss out once again.


Fans at Wembley
Fans pour into the first-ever Wembley final

Mortensen pulled one back when Bolton keeper Stan Hanson failed to hold a Matthews cross and then, with Hanson rooted to his line, smashed the equaliser from 25 yards. Mortensen had a hat-trick - but when Matthews dribbled to the byline with a minute to go and crossed for Perry to score the winner, there was only one man the world was talking about the following day.

1966 - Trebilcock brings Everton back from the dead
There was another final at Wembley in 1966, but this one was almost as exciting. Wednesday, with six players aged 21 or under, raced into a shock 2-0 lead after just 18 minutes. Then Cornishman Mike Trebilcock, a virtual unknown before the game, went to work. He pulled one goal back on 20 minutes and then, on 68, lashed home an equaliser.

It was a mistake that settled the most open and entertaining final in years. Labone hoofed the ball long from defence, Wednesday centre-half Gerry Young allowed the ball to squirm under his boot and Derek Temple slotted the winner past England keeper Ron Springett.

1979 - Sunderland saves Arsenal
With Arsenal two up through Talbot and Stapleton and cruising, the Gunners' ribbons were already being tied to the Cup. But with minutes to go, United pulled one back through McIlroy and then, sensationally, equalised though Gordon McQueen.

Not that it mattered. Brady attacked down the left, United's young keeper Gary Bailey came for the outswinging cross and missed it, and Alan Sunderland popped up at the back post. Celebrations like his wouldn't be seen again until Marco Tardelli notched in the 1982 World Cup Final.

1981 Villa... still Villa!
Substituted in the original game, Spurs' Argentine midfielder Ricardo Villa was considered fortunate to retain his starting place for the replay against John Bond's Manchester City.

With the game at 2-2, Villa himself having equalised in the second half, he picked the ball up on the left wing. Ignoring the claims of the better-placed Garth Crooks and Steve Archibald, he set off on a mazy run, beat four men and won the Cup for Spurs. Chas and Dave were made up.

1987 Houchen dives in
Spurs hadn't lost in an FA Cup Final; Coventry had never reached one. When Clive Allen put Spurs ahead early on, things looked grey for the Sky Blues. But thanks to Keith Houchen's diving header and, ultimately, Gary Mabbutt's own goal, the Cup was sent to Coventry. Chas and Dave were unavailable for comment.

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