Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: Sport: Football
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Sport 
Football 
Cricket 
Rugby Union 
Rugby League 
Tennis 
Golf 
Motorsport 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Wednesday, 16 February, 2000, 15:40 GMT
Japan star claims fastest hat-trick

Nakayama in World Cup action for Japan


Japan's Masashi Nakayama netted three times in the opening four minutes against Brunei to record the fastest hat-trick in the history of international football.

Individual records
World Cup final: Geoff Hurst (Eng) 3 goals, 1966
World Cup total: Just Fontaine (Fra) 13 goals, 1958
Career: Artur Friedenrich (Bra) 1,329 goals, 1910-1930
He scored on one minute, two minutes and three minutes 15 seconds as the tiny Asian state crashed to a 9-0 defeat in their Asian Cup qualifier.

The Japan star's feat - subject to official confirmation - improves on the 62-year-old mark set by England's George Hall, who completed his treble against Ireland in three minutes 30 seconds.

Nakayama's first strike was a simple knock-in from six yards after veteran striker Kazuyoshi Miura put him through.

Miura also set up the second, when a ricocheted shot rebounded kindly for his team-mate to volley home.

Kuwait 20-0 Bhutan

Goal three was the pick of the bunch as Nakayama outstripped the defence, drew the keeper wide and curled the ball into the top of the net.

International records
World Cup: Iran 17-0 Maldives 1997
Asian Cup: Kuwait 20-0 Bhutan 2000
European Champ: Spain 12-1 Malta 1983
Olympics: Denmark 17-1 France 1908
But Brunei can take some comfort from the fact that this was not the worst thrashing dished out during the qualifiers for next October's finals in Lebanon.

On Tuesday, Kuwait obliterated Bhutan 20-0, with Bashar Abdullah claiming eight goals and six other players, including goalkeeper Ahmad Jasim, also getting their names on the scoresheet.

The Bhutanese lack experience, having only just returned to international competition after years of isolation. Their cause was not helped by having two players sent off and conceding four penalties for rugby tackle-style challenges in the area.

China produced a similarly massive scoreline recently when they walloped the tiny Pacific island of Guam 19-0.

These massive margins of defeat have prompted the Asian Football Confederation to consider restructuring the qualifying rounds.

"Our priority is to give every one of our member nations the chance to compete and the opportunity to improve their football," said AFC General Secretary Peter Velappan.

"We want respectable scores. Clearly after such one-sided matches it is time for us to reconsider our structure."
Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
Football Contents

Africa

See also:
01 Dec 99 |  Football
Spacemen land for World Cup
14 Feb 00 |  Cup News
Football the winner in Africa
29 Sep 99 |  Asia-Pacific
No dogs on Seoul menus
06 Dec 99 |  Football
Pay TV for World Cup
02 Dec 99 |  Football
North Korea pull out of cup
Links to other Football stories are at the foot of the page.