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 You are in: Special Report: 1999: 08/99: World War II  
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World War II Friday, 3 September, 1999, 07:11 GMT 08:11 UK
The King speaks to his peoples
King and Queen
The King and Queen inspect bomb damage to Buckingham Palace
After the declaration of war, King George VI made a broadcast from Buckingham Palace entreating his subjects in Britain and throughout the Commonwealth to "stand calm, firm and united in this time of trial".

The day the war began
The King, Queen Elizabeth and their young daughters, the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, refused to leave London during the capital's subsequent bombing in which Buckingham Palace itself was hit.

During the Blitz more than 30,000 people were killed.


In this grave hour, perhaps the most fateful in our history, I send to every household of my peoples, both at home and overseas, this message, spoken as I were able to cross your threshold and speak to you myself.

For the second time in the lives of most of us we are at war. Over and over again we have tried to find a peaceful way out of the differences between ourselves and those who are now our enemies. But it has been in vain. We have been forced into a conflict. For we are called, with our allies, to meet the challenge of a principle which, if it were to prevail, would be fatal to any civilised order in the world.

It is the principle which permits a state, in the selfish pursuit of power, to disregard its treaties and its solemn pledges; which sanctions the use of force, or threat of force, against the sovereignty and independence of other states.

Such a principle, stripped of all its disguise, is surely the mere primitive doctrine that might is right; and if this principle were established throughout the world, the freedom of our own country and of the whole of the British Commonwealth of Nations would be in danger. But far more than this - the peoples of the world would be kept in the bondage of fear, and all hopes of settled peace and of security of justice and liberty among nations would be ended.

This is the ultimate issue which confronts us. For the sake of all that we ourselves hold dear, and of the world order and peace, it is unthinkable that we should refuse to meet the challenge.

It is to this high purpose that I now call my people at home and my peoples across the seas, who will make our cause their own. I ask them to stand calm, firm and united in this time of trial. The task will be hard. There may be dark days ahead, and war can no longer be confined to the battlefield. But we can only do the right as we see the right, and reverently commit our cause to God. If one and all we keep resolutely faithful to it, ready for whatever service or sacrifice it may demand, then, with God's help, we shall prevail. May He bless us and keep us all.


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King George VI: "In this grave hour"
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