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Edinburgh Festival 99 Saturday, 28 August, 1999, 08:39 GMT 09:39 UK
Del Boy rivals moon landing for top TV
Up there with Del Boy and Daleks
Man landing on the moon has been voted one of television's greatest moments in a poll of British TV viewers.

Edinburgh Festival 1999
Neil Armstrong's small step was rivalled only by Del Boy falling through the bar in Only Falls and Horses, and the Daleks saying "Exterminate!" in Dr Who.

The three moments were chosen by thousands of readers of the Radio Times magazine, and announced at the Edinburgh television festival.

Voters chose across three categories - drama, factual and comedy - from a shortlist compiled by the festival's executive committee.

"Exterminate! Exterminate!"
In the factual category, the moon landing in 1969 narrowly beat the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997.

This was followed by Michael Buerk's report from Ethiopia for BBC1 in 1984, the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, and Diana's interview with Martin Bashir, during which she discussed her marriage, on BBC1 in 1995.

'Gissa job'

In the comedy category, Del Boy's finest hour was followed by Dad's Army's "Don't tell him, Pike!", which was broadcast on BBC1 in 1973.

Only Fools and Horses supplied the funniest moment
Next was Blackadder going over the top in Blackadder Goes Forth, 1989 on BBC1.

Fourth was John Cleese saying: "Don't mention the war" in BBC2's Fawlty Towers in 1975, and Tony Hancock saying: "A pint? That's very nearly an armful!" in The Blood Donor, broadcast on BBC1 in 1961.

In drama, the 1960s was the dominant decade, with BBC1's 1963 Dr Who moment being closely followed by Cathy's children being taken away in Cathy Come Home, broadcast on BBC1 in 1966.

These two were followed by the rape of Irene Forsyte in the Forsyte Saga, broadcast on BBC2 in 1967, and Yosser Hughes saying "gissa job" in Boys from the Blackstuff, broadcast on BBC2 in 1982.

Fifth place was taken by Mrs Peel springing into action in a black catsuit in The Avengers, broadcast on ITV in 1965.

See also:

18 Oct 98 | Entertainment
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